AMD - Ryzen 5 2600

Discussion in 'Desktop Computers' started by lostsoul62, Oct 31, 2018.

  1. lostsoul62

    lostsoul62 Member

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    617
    I understand that the AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 is the best bang for the buck and is better than my i5 4690. So I figure I might as well build me a AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 computer, not that I need one but because I'm bored and will build it to learn mostly. So by building that computer I figure I will study each component and take about a hundred hours on it just to be doing something. I understand that the RAM takes 3200 and I guess that is the what I should put in? Also I only want to put in 8 GB's of Ram because I never seen my computers come close to using 8 GB's of Ram so putting in 16 GB's of RAM for me would only serve as an ego boots and I can always put in the other 8 GB's of RAM at a later date. So I'm figuring on Kingston Technology HyperX Predator Black 8GB Kit 3200MHz DDR4 which comes in 2X4 GB's and for only $100. Any options or ideas and am I on the right track?
     
  2. Deerling7

    Deerling7 Active Member

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    The RAM needs to be at least 2666 or higher, so 3200 is good.
     
  3. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

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    If you're just building to learn & sort of have no other purpose. Why not make a computer in a smaller form factor and turn it into say a kodi media center or even a hidden in the corner Samba server. Stream your music and other stuff easily to all your other computers.
     
    OmniDyne likes this.
  4. lostsoul62

    lostsoul62 Member

    Messages:
    617
    If you're just building to learn & sort of have no other purpose. Why not make a computer in a smaller form factor and turn it into say a kodi media center or even a hidden in the corner Samba server. Stream your music and other stuff easily to all your other computers.
    I have a AMD 955 which is 7 1/2 years old which I could do what your saying. I have amazon prime with fire TV, Netflix and antina TV so I'm not sure if kodi is right for me? I have a home network where all my computer share everything so I'm not sure how a Samba server would help me?
     
  5. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

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    91
    Use it how you want, it was just a suggestion.

    As for a antenna for a TV, Kodi can handle that with MythTV or various other frontends and act as a DVR. Of course you then have to add in a capture device that works with one of the plugins and maybe buy a decent sized HDD depending on how much TV you're recording. I do this very thing and have no cable, Netflix, Hulu, or any streaming services.

    Also, that AMD 955, might do a server, but not really be a good play back machine. At least not for some resolutions, bit rates, and with select codecs in containers. I would never want to hevc 10-bit with say flac audio in AVC/MKV on that machine. The buffering would be a nightmare.
     
  6. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

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    1,248
    I use a Athlon ii x2 250 machine for 4k hevc playback and it does so perfectly, because it has a 1050 with hardware acceleration ;). This seems to work great on most web explorers and media players, but I guess there will be a few programs out there that don't play nice with hardware acceleration or straight up don't support it.

    I also have my old q9550 gaming machine in my bedroom, replaced the gtx680 with an RX460 a while back, just finished watching Fargo in 4k h.265, not sure if it was in 8-bit or 10-bit without looking :).
     
  7. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

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    91
    Web browser playback is highly butchered. For example, you render a video and upload it to YouTube and then YouTube butchers it more in the process stage. (Though I will admit VP9 isn't horrid). The idea is to stream within the limitations of bandwidth. Heck even Netflix doesn't provide the same bit-rate playback as a true Bluray disc.

    Media Players do differ, but you're also avoiding the issue here. We're talking about streaming fully uncompressed media with heavy flac to raw PCM and 10bit over a network to your media player using Samba. Playing a video directly isn't as much of a chore from the disc. (Also no network involved or various other hiccups). Then circling back to your, "Hardware Acceleration" suggestion, well that can be hit or miss depending on your GPU on any software. I've had integrated graphics get it in some players, but just get nothing on some dedicated GPU's. (I've seen this on both Windows and Linux machines on various players).

    Fargo isn't even 4k. The series and old movie are on Blu-ray, but are only 1080p. If anything is 4k you're doing an upscale or your source has been repackaged and cropped to upscale. You're sort of doing the equivalent to adaptive resolution in video games.
    https://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Fargo-Blu-ray/4352/
    https://www.blu-ray.com/search/?qui...uicksearch_keyword=Fargo&section=bluraymovies
     
  8. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

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    1,248
    True, in this instance hardware acceleration may not even be needed as even older cpu's may be able to cope.

    I'm not avoiding anything, your talking about a samba server, sorry but I'm not, I didn't even mention it, I don't even know this program, but as it happens that I do use file server and I stream everything from it. If we are talking about a lan server, then gigabit networking is pretty much standard these days and transfer rates are around 100 megabytes a second, which means a 90 minute film would need to be larger than about 540GB (90mins=5,400 seconds × 100mbps = 540,000mb or 540gb) to max out a gigabit network, so I don't see how networking is an issue. Its simple for the server to send the data to the client pc and then the client pc has the hard task of playing back the video, if the cpu is not up to the task then a media player that supports hardware decoding can be used.

    Yes, I stated a GTX1050 and a RX460, but most new gpu's have the same support and simply use the hit software.

    It is when the uploader has uploaded it that way, video details: H.265 MPEG-H 3840 x 2160 and each episode is around 4gb.
     
  9. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

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    I'm not trying to be rude there. It's just you cherry picked what I said. My reply was within using Samba and Kodi and you turned it into sort of Netflix and web browser topics. Nothing to do with anything I was saying. A potato with a power cord can run most all that web based stuff. Heck when a Raspberry Pi, Roku, et cetera can do Netflix, YouTube, and more you know it's not much of a problem.

    Ugh, you're not being realistic hear. SMB has overhead (like any FTP style protocol) and IO limits of a HDD are real. RAID could help, but it's not going to just make it unstoppable. You're still looking at slower speed due to SATA limits as well. The dated hardware sure as heck does not have SATA 6GB so you take a hit there slightly. You can have a 16GB fiber line and be capping out at say 200Mbps just because of the drive. (Then if you do what I do and put a disc in a drive and use software just to stream the disc content while it plays back there is also limitations to that, but that's not just Samba at that point).

    .... Why just why.... I mean why would you want to watch an upscaled version of a video. When you upscale you make things look worse. Then you're uploading it to some player that's processing it to a web acceptable format degrading it more. If that isn't what you mean and this is some kind of uploader as in torrent, then I'm not going down that road. Though a 1080p from source isn't magically better when upscaled & you don't even know the codecs they used. If they used DSD you could be looking at a huge file size just from that. DSD for just a small album of short songs can be 1GB+. Then the provider just used Handbrake or other software to encode the sound per se to a Dolby or AAC output. (Though that is all I will get into on the subject of that).
     
  10. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

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    1,248
    I'm happy to hear, I too am not trying to be rude, just trying to make my point clear :).

    I'm talking about LAN and WAN content. If these programs can't take advantage of hardware acceleration then someone using a weak cpu could use something that does. You said that you didn't think an AMD 955 would make a good playback machine and that using one would be a buffering nightmare and I'm saying that it doesn't need to be this way, a cheap new gpu could turn a machine into a perfectly good playback machine, bearing in mind that an old machine would need to be upgraded with a HDMI 2.0 compatible GPU if 4k 60hz output is wanted over HDMI.

    If true, then this supports my claim that an old cpu would make a perfectly good playback machine.

    I use gigabit lan with a windows file server running 7200rpm hdd's and I get 100mb+ transfer speeds to the clients. Most hdd's are capable of 100-200mbps transfer speeds, but if there are hundreds/thousands of tiny files to transfer then it of course slows down a lot, but transfer speeds of single large files like video files can be transferred very fast.

    Doesn't need it, even IDE could get close to maxing a lot of hdd's at around 133mbps and then we got sata 150mbps and sata2 300mbps, hdd's haven't got much faster over the years, so to max out just sata2 you would need raid or even an ssd. The AMD 955 was released in 2008 and sata2 has been around since 2004, so a computer of this era should be able to push a hdd to the max no problem.

    Honestly I didn't know Fargo wasn't done in 4k, but this upscaled version did look very nice, but probably not worth the extra size, but I recently got an additional 8tb of storage for my server, so all is good.

    I very much disagree, displays can upscale signals e.g. 1080p to 4k and picture quality can be noticeably improved and the same can be for video content, but when done incorrectly it can look worse.

    Yes, this would be an example of a bad situation to upscale.

    I'm in Spain and region locked, also with few English viewing options, there is no other road, even when willing to pay.

    True, but its an uploader I recognise and his uploads do look better imo than normal 1080p.

    If you would like to send me a link to a test file of your choice (4k h.265 etc), I will put it on my server and try to stream it and I will take a video of how it performs ok?
    I have a few older cpu's I can test if you would like: E6600, Q8200, Q9550, AMD x2 250, 550, 620 and 955, I can pair these with either the 1050 or 460, your choice. I have a lot of tech from 2006 onward, so I can test most scenarios, so please give me one.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
  11. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

    Messages:
    91
    I understand that, but as I said if acceleration works out. I have seen acceleration turn screens green on Windows using stuff like PowerDVD, Kodi, et cetera. Sorry, but that's not functional and it isn't always an option. Which is the point you've been missing. I didn't go into as deep of detail, but still saying.

    I get that, but I've been talking about SMB + Kodi from the get go and always have been. You're the only one turning it into other protocols & software.

    Not at all. Again, possibly for web content, but no for a solution I have been getting at. Local play on even a Raspberry Pi 3 starts to choke. Web content is a different story. Because it has no real physical hardware decoder for hevc. It relays on software alone.

    Again, I'm talking about more than just large file transfer over your choose of protocol. SMB is slower than say NFS due to security measures and Kodi isn't just an playback media player. It pulls tons of media date you store via your share folder. If you're storing everything local it pulls actor photos, bookmarks, meta data, cover art, disc art, et cetera. Otherwise it pulls everything from a scraper here and there. All while running in a fairly customized GUI that can hit your system slightly with how you set the options. (Some systems more than others of course). Also, Kodi as say a DE has its own compositor. It does do some forms of caching data, but by default it doesn't do large amounts. Mainly because Kodi is designed to be a multi-OS and platform player that spans from Android devices, Amazon's stuff, Nvidia Shield, Raspberry Pi, Windows, GNU/Linux, et cetera. You can slightly fix this to speed things up, but that requires you to edit config files. Which I'm sure the average joe isn't doing. Regardless, I've been talking media center plus SMB style stuff from the get go. Nothing else nothing more. (There are things like Plex, but I refuse to use that. I do not like the way things are done so I can't completely comment to indepth on it).

    Some people like filters I guess. I've done edits of projects I've made with such filters. Stuff right off my camera I filmed. I sure do not like stuff like Lapsharp, HQDN3D, et cetera when it's not needed. It makes it a bit more smudged and decolored than the original. It tries to hide the lack of pixels. When something isn't shot in that resolution, you can't just add quality because it injects fixes for the missing pixels. Regardless, what looks and sounds good in the end is just subjective I suppose. If you like it, you like it. I'm not here trying to change your mind really. I've got better things to do than try and force you to not like filtering, lol. All I can say is I could probably bare it for such a white snow movie. I mean, at least the movie isn't in the Jungle or I would probably just destroy it right then and there. (If you didn't know the human eye can see more shades of green than any other color. That filters and other methods of degrading the image would murder it for me. Specially on my 10bit panels).

    As mentioned before, I'm not torrenting. Find something on your own if you're wanting to test something. I buy all my media physically. I will admit when I was younger I was into the torrent thing with MP3's. Well not so much torrenting then, but Napster and other nonsense. Regardless, I've grown up and have the money to spend so I have the faintest clue of what is out there. Also, let's not get this thread locked for OP's sake with your talks of torrents.

    ---
    Honestly, I think this topic has been hijacked enough. I've clearly stated again and again I'm focused on my reply about Kodi + Samba. Case closed detective. I'm sort of fine talking all the non-related stuff via PM. Though, I still hold the I'm not getting into torrents subject. I don't participate in it now and never will. Well outside of Linux ISO's, but that's all setup via the distros themselves and the OS's are completely free.

    As I said not replying after this. If you feel you have to win or something go for it. You win, here is your prize, wasted time, lol.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
  12. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

    Messages:
    1,248
    Hardware acceleration isn't an IF, its a feature that works well, if some programs are not coded properly to use it or simply don't support it then that's the failing of the programmers, not the hardware. I personally have no problems getting hardware acceleration to work as its so easy and its supported out of the box by many programs, if powerdvd and kodi are coded so poorly then I would think twice about using them, there are many other free solutions that do work perfectly.

    That's fine and it may not work in those programs, but just because they aren't coded well doesn't mean an AMD 955 machine wont make a good playback machine, this is my only contention, an AMD 955 can easily be a perfectly functional playback machine.

    I'm sorry, but this is a contradiction. I would say that being capable of web playback is an important component of any playback machine, anyway I do understand you only concerned with smb and kodi local playback. You are stating that just because an AMD 955 can't give good playback with these programs it means its a bad playback machine, this is simply untrue.
    I have only been trying to tell you since my first post that an old machine can be used for video playback, I understand you are talking about smb and kodi, but I didn't bring them up because I wasn't ever talking about them.

    Ok, so after a short time all the media data has been pulled to the client, its only a few pics and text, there might be a lot of it, but size wise is not very large when compared to the video files and it isn't being constantly pulled, its loaded and its done, after that its then free to play the video file. I have about 500 films and I used to use kodi, if I remember correctly the client stored a lot of the data locally and just needed the video file streamed.

    I'm sorry but I didn't bring it up, you did lol ;). I can give my money to a company that illegally provides English tv or I can do it myself for free, money isn't a problem, but I can't legally pay for the services I want, so who's fault is that.

    I don't know much about video upscale editing done to video files, I just know that download was much better than others, but the upscaling methods used by some panels are great, my 4k tv upscales 1080p signals from my, xbox, xbox 360, ps3 and ps4 and wow they look way sharper than any 1080p panel I've seen and its not just me, many friends have commented how much better these 1080p systems look on my 4k tv.

    I have found an LG sample video, its HEVC 10.bit H.265 in mkv format, I will try this.

    Edit: My transfer rate between my server running 5400rpm Toshiba drives and my gaming rig:

    transfer rate.png

    I'm currently uploading a video of the test, which will take some time, if you see any problems or issues with the test then please point them out and I will correct them. I used a HEVC 10-bit 4k mkv LG sample file streamed from my Toshiba 5400rpm hdd server to a AMD Phenom 2 550 with 4gb ram and an RX460:
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2018

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