Backlight bleed - unlucky or is it every where?

Discussion in 'Video Cards and Monitors' started by evotz, Jun 21, 2019.

  1. evotz

    evotz New Member

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    So, long story short - I recently purchased two new monitors - one was an Acer 24" and one was an HP 21" - both monitors suffered from backlight bleed, that's just really made them unusable for me.

    I work in Linux - I have a lot of xterms opened up at any given time and use a black background for those - perhaps that just magnifies the issue. But I'm not currently seeing the issue on this 19" LG monitor that I'm currently using.

    My old 19" 4:3 monitor died earlier this year. I had previously bought this LG monitor at a yard sale - mainly to keep on hand to easily plug up to another computer when someone brings me their computer to work on. I didn't notice it at the time, but there are a couple of chips in the screen - nothing really too bothersome - and hey, I paid $10 for it - so I'm not complaining.

    But trying to replace this monitor, I keep coming up with monitors with the horrible backlight bleed issue. Granted, I'm not spending a ton of money for these monitors, less than $100. But I don't really need a high price monitor - I don't play games, I don't really do anything that demanding of a monitor.

    Am I just unlucky in getting monitors? Or is the backlight bleed issue really that prevalent. The old 19" 4:3 monitor didn't have this issue. This 19" LG doesn't have this issue.
     
  2. StrangleHold

    StrangleHold Moderator Staff Member

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    19,543
    Well if they do have bleed running a black background will make it show up worse. Loosen the panel screws a hair. They really screw them down at the factory and over time can make the panel warp just enough.
     
  3. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    Are they IPS or TN panels? IPS panels bleed the most. It's generally pretty normal. Even expensive IPS panels suffer from bleeding. IPS panels look a lot better than TN panels and the trade off is usually backlight bleed.
     
  4. evotz

    evotz New Member

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    9
    I actually don't see any screws on it, but it's entirely possible that I'm overlooking them. I just bought it last week, I'm sure I'm still within the return policy window.

    It's an HP 22yh monitor, which I believe is TN and not IPS.

    What was before LED backlighting? I'm thinking this LG W1952TQ monitor may not be LED backlit, it's a tiny bit heavier and a bit thicker - but it doesn't seem to have any backlight bleed. Perhaps those types of monitors (whatever they are) are less prone to backlight bleeding? But I think everything that is sold these days is LED backlit.
     
  5. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    642
    It's possible you could return it. It's also possible the bleed will go away. I have an Acer SA230 and originally it had substantial bleeding; it went away with time.

    Before LED there was cold cathode directly behind the screen and this is why bleed wasn't prevalent, but the screens were much bigger and heavier.

    There are two main types of LED backlighting; full-array and edge. Apparently edge lighting is the cheapest to manufacture and that's probably where the backlight bleed comes from, especially on cheaper models.

    The Acer monitor I own doesn't have screws on the screen itself; the base houses everything, including the LEDs. As a result, the bleed comes from the bottom of the screen.
     
  6. evotz

    evotz New Member

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    9
    Here's what the backlight bleed looks like. I know digital photos kind of exaggerate the bleed, but the lower left is where it is the worst.

    hp_22yh-2.jpg

    This is with the Youtube backlight bleed video running and brightness set to 0.

    I did try playing some movies on it for a few hours, just to see if it would help it to clear up. Probably not long enough, but I didn't see any improvements.

    I guess I'm just surprised that this is such an issue. I had an old 4:3 monitor, it didn't have backlight bleed. This LG monitor doesn't have backlight bleed. Then in 2019 I bought 2 new monitors and both had significant backlight bleed. I really never thought of backlight bleed being such an issue given my experience in the past. Then when I bought the Acer monitor back in March and it had backlight bleed, I thought it was just an unlucky draw. But now this HP has got it... just... seems like technology is going backwards.
     
  7. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    642
    That's what mine looks like, but it's on both sides. It's normal.

    It's a trade off. The newer TN and IPS panels are brighter and look better than older style panels. You're spending less than $100 on monitors; sometimes you get what you pay for.

    That old LG monitor when new probably cost twice as much as the newer monitors you bought, has shittier brightness, is bulky, and has an old dull TN panel.

    You paid less than $100 for a 24" bright LED monitor and got light bleed that only shows during total blackness. This doesn't mean technology is going backwards, it means you're getting what you paid for. I'll take light bleed over the older style LCD screens any day. First world problems, bro.
     
  8. evotz

    evotz New Member

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    9
    Meh!

    Not really going to disagree with you that that's just the way it is... but man! I definitely consider this a step backwards and it's a shame that it's so universally accepted.

    Unless the LG monitor's technology if manufactured today (I believe this LG monitor was first produced in 2014) cost more than the HP's production (which I believe was released in 2018), then yea, I'd definitely take the LG monitor's technology today over the HP's. According to the specs the LG weighs 7.7lbs and the HP weighs 5.7lbs. 7.7lbs isn't a lot to me, and I'd definitely take the extra weight if it meant less backlight bleed, even if a 22" LG comparative weighed 10lbs.

    I guess I'm just getting too old. Hang on a minute, there's kids on my front yard I have to go yell at them.
     
  9. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    Try 2009. 1440x900 resolution; yeah it's old and obsolete in every way ha.

    You're scraping the bottom of the barrel for cheap ass monitors. Again, that old LG monitor with a 1440x900 resolution was probably twice the cost of the Acer and HP you purchased.

    How you're not seeing an incredible difference in picture quality and resolution, I really don't understand. There's no way that old LG is comparable in any way to the newer monitors you bought.
     
  10. evotz

    evotz New Member

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    9
    Oh, I definitely agree, I'm in the vast minority with my opinion.

    Like I said, I don't do anything extravagant with my monitor or computer. Most of my day is spent reading through logs and config files in white text on a black background. I'm sure that's why it's a more pronounced issue for me.

    If I were doing gaming or a lot of other GUI applications, it might be different.
     
  11. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    642
    Hmm, you could go with higher end refurbished monitors for cheaper and probably find some good reviews on them or spend more money on a new one, if possible. You're probably right, having a black background is probably quite distracting.
     

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