Best/worst computer brands.

CastletonSnob

New Member
If you don't feel like building your own computer and would rather get a prebuilt, what are the best major computer brands? The worst?
 

voyagerfan99

Master of Turning Things Off and Back On Again
Staff member
If I was going to go pre-built I'd probably go with CyberPower. If I had unlimited money to blow, probably Falcon Northwest.

Worst is anything entry line consumer. Dell Inspiron. Anything HP. Acer.
 

Pupp

Member
I'd stay away from Lenovo. They're the Packard Bell of the 21st century.

For those that don't know, Packard Bell made a lot of cheap computers that were sold at Best Buy, Walmart, etc... The build quality sucked.

Sadly, Lenovo stepped right into that market and hasn't looked back.

A prime example is (a current side project of mine), that was bought by an older relative (Who thought the cheapest computer in Best Buy was overpriced)... a Lenovo IdeaCentre 300s.

It's a pc built on a laptop motherboard, so it's doesn't have a PSU like a normal computer [that even worse than Packard Bell's crap], but rather a brick adapter that runs either at 60 watts or 90 watts. (Which after nearly 4 years, I still haven't been able to pin down if it's 60 watts or 90 watts). Essentially, it a laptop that doesn't have a battery, in a PC case, but plugged into the wall like a laptop would be, with the tiniest strand of wire to keep it powered up. Oh, ya, the CPU is only 6.5 watts, if I recall. And this relative was trying to use photoshop on gargantuan files with only 4GB of ram and integrated GPU. :eek:
 

johnb35

Administrator
Staff member
I'd stay away from Lenovo. They're the Packard Bell of the 21st century.

For those that don't know, Packard Bell made a lot of cheap computers that were sold at Best Buy, Walmart, etc... The build quality sucked.

Sadly, Lenovo stepped right into that market and hasn't looked back.

A prime example is (a current side project of mine), that was bought by an older relative (Who thought the cheapest computer in Best Buy was overpriced)... a Lenovo IdeaCentre 300s.

It's a pc built on a laptop motherboard, so it's doesn't have a PSU like a normal computer [that even worse than Packard Bell's crap], but rather a brick adapter that runs either at 60 watts or 90 watts. (Which after nearly 4 years, I still haven't been able to pin down if it's 60 watts or 90 watts). Essentially, it a laptop that doesn't have a battery, in a PC case, but plugged into the wall like a laptop would be, with the tiniest strand of wire to keep it powered up. Oh, ya, the CPU is only 6.5 watts, if I recall. And this relative was trying to use photoshop on gargantuan files with only 4GB of ram and integrated GPU. :eek:
It's called cost cutting and making the most money with cheap hardware. HP does the same thing with some of their systems. This is why you must do your homework before going out and buying the cheapest thing on the shelf. I would buy a lenovo before a buy an HP now. However, I have built my own pc's for the last 20 years.
 

Pupp

Member
It's called cost cutting and making the most money with cheap hardware. HP does the same thing with some of their systems. This is why you must do your homework before going out and buying the cheapest thing on the shelf. I would buy a lenovo before a buy an HP now. However, I have built my own pc's for the last 20 years.

You can take a person out to shop for a computer, but you can't force them to buy what you suggest. In any event, one could have a topic on cheap computers that goes on for pages of replies. But YES: cost cutting budget computers have been around for a long time. That doesn't mean the computers are complete junk. Some can run for 7 or more years without issues...
...but it depends on the user's requirements. In this case, a 6.5 watt CPU isn't really cut out to run Adobe software. Although adding the inexpensive graphic card and more ram at least made it tolerable.

I think Lenovo had to stop making desktop quite that cheaply, because they started putting a USB Type C port on the desktops, so they have to make sure the desktop has enough juice to power the USB ports. The Type C port has to be able to put out 15 watts of juice. Plus I think in general, people expect a desktop to have more than 90 watts of power in 2021.

I'm not against budget desktops, as long as it can meet the user's needs. It's when the user's needs exceeds the capabilities of the budget computer that you run into problems. I look at a computer as a part of a person's basic needs in the modern world, but not everybody can afford an expensive computer, or needs a computer for much other than email, social networking, and other basic items. If someone is using a computer for basic stuff like that, there's little reason to spend more than you need.

I know back in my college days in the 90's, all I could afford was a Packard Bell's cheapest computer, and it got me through college and couple years after that. By then it couldn't run any newer software worth installing. That's not so much an issue nowadays unless the person is using heavy applications like Video Editing or most of Adobe's stuff. I haven't looked at budget computers in 4 years, so I can't even form an opinion of what a budget PC can do now.
 
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