Brutally Honest Critiques

Okedokey

Well-Known Member
You would be better off not posting claims that make absolutely no sense.

"Dude, the 930 has various iso settings which adjust things."
Yes. I am correct. It automatically adjusts the shutter speeds depending on the ISO setting selected and with the nokia app, you are able to adjust white balance, focus, ISO, shutter speed and exposure value - giving you the same level of control as a full digital SLR camera.. You're just annoyed that my cheap windows phone gives your photos a good challenge and is probably a 10th the cost.
 

Geoff

VIP Member
Yes. I am correct. It automatically adjusts the shutter speeds depending on the ISO setting selected and with the nokia app, you are able to adjust white balance, focus, ISO, shutter speed and exposure value - giving you the same level of control as a full digital SLR camera.. You're just annoyed that my cheap windows phone gives your photos a good challenge and is probably a 10th the cost.
You have nowhere near the same controls as a DSLR, you just have the basic exposure settings, which you can download on the Play Store for Android as well. I'm aware you can adjust those settings, but your previous post implied that changing the ISO "adjusts things", in a way to explain it without actually knowing what it does.

I'm not annoyed, as it doesn't come close to my DSLR. If it was truly taking with a phone camera that's impressive, I just don't see how you can get the circular star trails with such a short exposure. With a comparable FL lens, I can take an exposure of ~15 seconds before there are any signs of star trails. Normally I'd pass it off as camera movement, which is probably the reason why I see the star trails, but it appears to be a circular star trail that is moving around the stationary center stars.
 

NikonGuy

banned
Yes. I am correct. It automatically adjusts the shutter speeds depending on the ISO setting selected and with the nokia app, you are able to adjust white balance, focus, ISO, shutter speed and exposure value - giving you the same level of control as a full digital SLR camera.. You're just annoyed that my cheap windows phone gives your photos a good challenge and is probably a 10th the cost.
You realize I can run all your EXIF data from that photo anytime I wanted, and i'm willing to bet the exposure will be longer than 1second and anything past 1 second you could never hld by hand getting a result like that. I can believe this might have been done with a phone, possible, but there is no way on earth you just stood there pointed your phone at the sky and snapped that pic. No.
You have nowhere near the same controls as a DSLR, you just have the basic exposure settings, which you can download on the Play Store for Android as well. I'm aware you can adjust those settings, but your previous post implied that changing the ISO "adjusts things", in a way to explain it without actually knowing what it does.

I'm not annoyed, as it doesn't come close to my DSLR. If it was truly taking with a phone camera that's impressive, I just don't see how you can get the circular star trails with such a short exposure. With a comparable FL lens, I can take an exposure of ~15 seconds before there are any signs of star trails. Normally I'd pass it off as camera movement, which is probably the reason why I see the star trails, but it appears to be a circular star trail that is moving around the stationary center stars.
This. While some new phones can take some pretty goo shots, you could never ever compare a phone to even a $1000 DSLR. Not happening. And the phone sure as hell can't handle such a high ISO that you would need to get a fast enough shutter to hand hold that.
 

Geoff

VIP Member
You realize I can run all your EXIF data from that photo anytime I wanted.
What a surprise, he stripped the EXIF data off the photo.

Just for kicks, upload the photo someplace that doesn't strip EXIF data so we can see what settings were used.
 

Punk

Moderator
Staff member
I call you out on that. If you look at the star trails, the ones in the center are for the most part consistent in their location, while the trails get longer as you get further away from the center. This is what happens when you take a long exposure of the sky, no way could this happen with just 1-2 seconds hand held.
Yeah I second what Geoff said, sounds like BS to me. You could end this by uploading the picture with exif but whatever...
 

NikonGuy

banned
What a surprise, he stripped the EXIF data off the photo.
:eek: :eek: :eek:


( ^ Sarcasm ) :D

@ Okedoke, The ONLY reason i'm making any deal out of this is I hate a lie when I see it. And until you can show us the actual info, it's a lie. If you are telling the truth than you should have nothing to hide. I'll admit I was wrong when you can show everyone I Was wrong. I mean cmon, you want to tell a group of photographers that ( Nevermind... )
 

Okedokey

Well-Known Member
Ok guys. Yeah, I borrowed a 1000 dollar camera, went to the middle of nowhere, took a photo of some stars, copied it to my phone, uploaded from my phone to the photobucket, stripped the EXIF (whatever that is), and posted it here, just so I could cop a load of epic immaturity and accusations.
 

Okedokey

Well-Known Member
Dude, why would i post a shitty photo like that and then call it a phone? Why? Also, there is nothing going in circles.

How do i upload without losing that exif thing?
 
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Punk

Moderator
Staff member
You guys clearly havent seen australian stars....
You haven't seen Alpine stars either, I know what bright stars is, that doesn't change anything. I'll repeat what Geoff. Above the campsite you'll see the stars as dots, if you look to the left, they'll have a trail. That's because you were further away from the North star to the left, and the trail you see is due to the Earth's rotation. But you usually see that trail at around 20 seconds exposure, especially at that focal length.
 
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Okedokey

Well-Known Member
We do have alpine stars mate, plus much cleaner air and less light pollution. The 930 has a lot of options including a multi-dial mode to quickly change ISO, shutter speed, focus and white balance and an option that takes multiple (10) pictures over a set time, which are then overlaid. You guys really need to look up the phone before you lose your shit over it. Its getting pathetic.
 
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Punk

Moderator
Staff member
We do have alpine stars mate, plus much cleaner air and less light pollution. The 930 has a lot of options including a multi-dial mode to quickly change ISO, shutter speed, focus and white balance and an option that takes multiple (10) pictures over a set time, which are then overlaid. You guys really need to look up the phone before you lose your shit over it. Its getting pathetic.
What's getting pathetic is you trying to tell me alpine stars at 3000m high aren't brighter than Aus stars. Anyways now you're giving us something new. Did you use the stacking option?

Instead of telling what your phone can do, tell us what you used (options). And even better, upload the exif data.
 
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Punk

Moderator
Staff member
Hey punk. You know what is even better. Shoosh.
Since this is going nowhere, let's move on from this BS.



It is an HDR of three different exposures spaced by 1 EV. It looks pretty much like what I was seeing but it isn't 100% perfect...
 

Geoff

VIP Member
Ok guys. Yeah, I borrowed a 1000 dollar camera, went to the middle of nowhere, took a photo of some stars, copied it to my phone, uploaded from my phone to the photobucket, stripped the EXIF (whatever that is), and posted it here, just so I could cop a load of epic immaturity and accusations.
You guys clearly havent seen australian stars....
Oke, we are not saying this photo was not taken with your Nokia 930. We are saying this photo was not a ~1 second hand held shot, which you claimed it was.

We do have alpine stars mate, plus much cleaner air and less light pollution. The 930 has a lot of options including a multi-dial mode to quickly change ISO, shutter speed, focus and white balance and an option that takes multiple (10) pictures over a set time, which are then overlaid. You guys really need to look up the phone before you lose your shit over it. Its getting pathetic.
You act as if Australia is the best of the best for astrophotography. There are many places in the world where one can find a clear sky, just look at where the major telescopes are.

ISO and shutter speed are all that matter here, white balance and focus don't make a difference in capturing that shot with that much light.

As for taking multiple photos and combining them, I believe you are referring to HDR mode, which takes 3 or more shots (exposed, under exposed, and over exposed), and combines them. This is not the same as image stacking which is used in astrophotography. HDR mode will not help here, and will actually make the photo much worse due to the even longer exposure needed to overexpose this photo.

Since this is going nowhere, let's move on from this BS.



It is an HDR of three different exposures spaced by 1 EV. It looks pretty much like what I was seeing but it isn't 100% perfect...
I do like this photo, it looks very natural. However because it looks natural, it lacks any sort of "pop" that one tends to associate with landscapes. To be blunt, it looks very dark, dreary, and muted. The trees look a bit underexposed as well as I can't see much detail in them, and the mountains look a bit soft, likely due to the cloud/fog in between.
 
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