Does anyone use a home theater receiver for their PC?

Discussion in 'Sound Cards and Speakers' started by gillmanjr, Dec 21, 2018.

  1. gillmanjr

    gillmanjr Member

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    I'm just curious if anyone does this. I assume most modern sound cards and even built in MOBO cards now have optical outputs, as my Z97 does. Does anyone use it to connect to a home theater receiver and drive an actual 5.1 system?

    I'm asking because I have an older Pioneer HD home theater receiver and a really nice set of Polk RSi speakers and sub. I am about to switch my home theater to an Atmos sound bar and I was wondering if it would be worth it to use my receiver and speakers for my PC. Is the sound quality better than a typical PC speaker setup with a single 3.5mm connection?
     
  2. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Active Member

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    Some of my machines use Toslink to connect to such devices. It works fine as you're just outputting the digital signal to the receiver totally bypassing the DAC/AMP built into the motherboard.

    If you're using a digital means of connection as mentioned you bypass right into the hardware DAC and/or AMP. How good your hardware converts digital to analog will be the factor on how good it sounds. That and some subjective means as sound can be quiet subjective to what sounds good.
     
  3. gillmanjr

    gillmanjr Member

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    "Toslink" is an optical port, thats what I was talking about in my OP. Toslink is a name brand (Toshiba something).
     
  4. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Active Member

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    Yes it's an optical port and I have that standard and if we want to get technical S/PDIF as well. Though, you did ask if anyone was using such a setup. I answered with a yes and implying it works fine. Along with results can vary based on hardware (DAC's). I also stated, anything optical will take the digital signal and completely bypass the motherboards DAC/AMP. Because at that point it's just ones and zeros waiting to be turned into an analog signal by a DAC.

    Confused on if you're saying I didn't answer your question or what... Because, that is exactly how optical works and results will vary based on your hardware converting it to analog. Also, what sounds good is subjective because some DAC's people like to use vacuum tubes to have that humish like guitar amp feel & various other style DAC's. Results very on what sounds good based on the person. (I've dabbled in the so called Audiophile scene with expensive hardware. One person will tell you this sounds good, while another will say it's crap).
     
  5. gillmanjr

    gillmanjr Member

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    Yea I get your answer, you were basically saying that it works and how good it sounds will depend on how good the receiver is. I get it, thank you for the response. Though, I have to tell you, the way you went about communicating that information is incredibly obtuse. I'm not looking for technical information about the difference between digital and analog, I'm familiar with the difference. I want subjective information. I want to know if anyone does it and if its worth the trouble of having a receiver sitting on your desk. Given the fact that no one else has responded to this thread, the answer to that question appears to be NO.
     
  6. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Active Member

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    144
    Take it or leave it then. Call it obtuse or whatever, because how optical connections work is the way it will perform based on the sound equipment converting to analog.

    Why would you want subjective information? Subjective information is what makes being called an "Audiophile" a bad thing. Paying thousands of dollars to someone to cryo-freeze your cables, hundreds of dollars on magical rocks, and other nonsense because it makes it sound good, lol. (None of which are jokes, Audiophiles have done this and still do).

    Anyway, have a fun journey.
     
  7. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    376
    I used to have an older computer connected to my 5.1 surround system with an optical audio cable. I thought it was amazing.
     

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