New SSD and HDD fried?

Discussion in 'Computer Memory and Hard Drives' started by Tim Ranbarger, Mar 28, 2019.

  1. Tim Ranbarger

    Tim Ranbarger New Member

    Messages:
    4
    So to start off this is a fresh PC build, my 5th one to date so I know somewhat what I'm doing but this has left me clueless. I wanted to run my new OS off my SSD and put everything else on my hdd.

    So I installed a fresh OS (Windows 10) on my new SSD. After windows installed and booted up I downloaded some random stuff to make sure the pc ran good which it did. After running it for a few hours testing I shut it down because I wanted to add my new HDD.... After I powered it down (I did remove power from the PC) I plugged in my new HDD (both sata and power cables) I put the HDD in series with my SSD using the same sata power cable since there's multiple connection sites on a single cable I figured this is common practice. Now, after I powered on the pc it no longer recognizes either SSD or HDD. I turned off the pc and disconnected the HDD to see if my SSD still worked and it doesn't, the bios doesn't even recognize that anymore. I ran through all the connections making sure everything was seated. I did the same with the HDD hooking it up by itself to see if something would register but bios wouldn't recognize that either (These are both brand new units and hardware). I installed my old pc's HDD on this new build and it worked just fine so that tells me it's got to be something internally wrong with the new SSD and HDD. I didn't hear any noise or smell of burnt electronics while this happened. Did I do something wrong or is it possible that I could have gotten a faulty HDD resulting in the damage of my both units?

    PC specs

    I5 9600k
    2x8gb Rippjaw DDR4 3200
    Asrock z390 extreme4
    samsung evo 860 500gb SSD
    Seagate barracuda 2tb HDD
    GTX 1070 Gigabyte G1
    Corsair 650w 80+bronze PSU
     
  2. johnb35

    johnb35 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    41,667
    Test the ssd and hdd in your old system first. Also make sure that the ssd and hdd is connected to sata ports 0 and 1 on the new motherboard. You might have to look in the manual to determine which ones those are.
     
  3. Tim Ranbarger

    Tim Ranbarger New Member

    Messages:
    4
    I took them to a pc store and they both tested bad, HDD didn't even spin up at all and SSD was completely brain dead. I've read a lot of reviews about Seagate having faulty HDD's but I'm not sure. Maybe the HDD had a bad ground or shorted out and fried. Everyone I talk to seems to not know what happened. Are there different sata pcie cables that supply different power voltages? Also I have my sata pcie power connector connected the to peripheral ports on the PSU. Is that correct? My biggest issue is I don't want to install them again and have this happen if it was user error. I seem to have it hooked up right from what everyone has been telling me.

    This guy seems to have the same problem and blames his cable. I'll quote what he says.

    "my 6 pin- 15pin SATA is not compatible with the intel motherboards
    It is mid-wired and not providing the correct voltage to the peripheral. It also renders the system inoperative, while anything is plugged in, it shorts out the system preventing the booting.
    I found out the hard way, ordered another cable thinking that this one was defective. The replacement was exact same as this one. It also didn’t work. It was too late to ship back the first purchase, but returned the second after squiring the proper intel cable. No issues with the correct intel replacement. Your cable has the wrong wiring configuration and coonectors are not marked ODD/SSD As they should be".

    Also I did check the manual and it's very vague with the sata port labeling. But I do believe I had them in the right ports. Asrock's manual is terrible and I need a magnifying glass to even see the diagram. I had SSD hooked to sata 0a1 and HDD to the one next to it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 30, 2019
  4. johnb35

    johnb35 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    41,667
    Wait, so you are not using the already supplied sata cables on the psu but an adapter? If so thats your mistake.
     
  5. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

    Messages:
    545
    Can you provide some pictures of the adapters you're using?
     
  6. Tim Ranbarger

    Tim Ranbarger New Member

    Messages:
    4
    I have the pcie sata power ribbon cable connected in series to power both devices and the sata to motherboard cable connected.

    I am using the factory sata and pcie cables supplied with my psu no adapter. Straight from power supply to storage unit and sata cable to storage unit to motherboard.

    Everything's keyed so theres no way to really f up the routing. I'm pretty sure I didnt hook them up wrong.

    I guess what I'm really asking is could a bad ssd or hdd cause a short that could potentially fry them both at the same time. It's the only thing that makes sense at this point.
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 30, 2019
  7. johnb35

    johnb35 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    41,667
    So you are saying that you have a modular psu? Just make sure the sata power connector cables are plugged into the right port on the psu. It should be pinned or labeled correctly. I find it very weird that both hdd and SSD fried.
     
  8. Tim Ranbarger

    Tim Ranbarger New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Yeah semi modular psu. The SATA power is hooked up to the peripheral port. Is that correct?

    Well I just got my new shipment of HDD and SSD. I hooked them up the exact same way and they're both working fine. Total BS on Seagates part selling such crap. I've read on numerous forums they've been selling defective units and it's real shady of them to be selling things without testing them first. I'm going to blame Seagate but my Samsung SSD could have been to blame also, however I would imagine a company such as Samsung would have better quality control.

    Either way thanks for the comments and support. Be weary of Seagate products in the future, I know I will.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 30, 2019
  9. johnb35

    johnb35 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    41,667
    Certain Seagate hdd's do have a high failure rate. However, the Samsung SSD going bad isn't imaginable unless like a power spike happened. Something had to happen to make both drives go out at once. Could be a psu problem...
    Yes
     

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