[Pc Build] Starting/Info Stage.

Discussion in 'Desktop Computers' started by zuXi, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Im looking to build a Pc that will put me on highest settings for now,
    and then gradually last me over the couple years to come.

    Where are you located?
    Canada
    How much are you willing to spend?
    $2000-3000 Canadian
    What will you primarly use the computer for?
    Gaming, possible video editing.
    Which online stores/reatil shops do you prefer to buy from?
    Newegg.ca
    What Programs/Tasks/Games will you run on the computer?
    Aion, Borderlands, Battlefield Series, Call of Duty Series, Sony Vegas
    Are you willing to go over budget? If so by how much?
    Gave a wide range, but i think 3000 will be the highest.
    Do you need anything besides the computer itself? (monitor,
    keyboard, operating system etc.)

    Windows 7, and only a HDMI graphics card to hook up to my 42inch tv.

    I would post up a pre-build. But i know it would be completely wrong.
    Question, is the 5870 top of the line now ?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Gooberman

    Gooberman Active Member

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    3,230
    5970 is the top of the line right now it's 2 5870s on one board with lower clocks
     
  3. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Except anywhere you go those cards will be out of stock and in backorder. getting two 5770's would make a good short term fix as they perform around the same as a 4870, but slightly less. but you have DX11. :)
     
  4. Stoic Sentinel

    Stoic Sentinel New Member

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    1,793
    And that Eye-Finity thing :D
     
  5. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
    I see the 5870, instock somewhere and also one that
    isnt instock below it. Except the title has "XXX Edition"
    in the title and is 30bucks cheaper. Core clock and the
    processor are a slight notch lower than the other card.

    Im type of guy who likes the best of the best, so i guess
    I have a long wait before i get my hands on a new comp
     
  6. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
  7. Jet

    Jet VIP Member

    Messages:
    6,228
  8. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Ive noticed that, yesterday there was a XXX series one
    there for 30 bucks more and difference specs.
     
  9. Jet

    Jet VIP Member

    Messages:
    6,228
    I just checked--the XXX version just is slightly overclocked--with a few minutes, you can do that to most any 5870 without spending the extra $30.
     
  10. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Perfect thanks.
    Now i just need to find out what else to select for my build.
    ATI requires AMD mobo ? Which one would you recommend ?
     
  11. Jet

    Jet VIP Member

    Messages:
    6,228
    ATi does not require an AMD motherboard--any motherboard with a PCI Express 2.0 slot will do. With your price range, I'd buy an Intel i7 920 with an X58 motherboard, 6GB of DDR3 1600 (triple channel), etc.
     
  12. Jet

    Jet VIP Member

    Messages:
    6,228
  13. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
  14. Jet

    Jet VIP Member

    Messages:
    6,228
    If you want to spend way more than you need to, get the EVGA. However, I would strongly recommend the i7 920 and the ASUS P5T. The ECS motherboard is not that great, the EVGA is too much, but the ASUS is right where you get the best deals. If you want to spend money, buy a Solid State hard drive for your OS and programs--that will give you much more performance for what you are spending.

    Also--are you planning on overclocking?
     
  15. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Did you mean the P55 ? Cause i dont see a P5T.
    I see, P55, X58 and X48.

    This mobo is half the price of the EVGA, still a X58.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131386

    I have never OC before, i had thought about it with
    my current ASUS G2, but the 8600GT idles at a temp
    of 72'C already.

    If i knew the cons of OC i could give you an answer.
    More power consumption, requires better cooling ?

    Edit - Also, never heard of Solid state hard drives
    before. Theyre more expensive than internal HDs
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2009
  16. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Have fun with your build! I'm glad to see people taking a look at that thread i made :)

    Problems with OCing:

    Can be finicky, you must get everything stable
    Some games are not good with overclocked hardware (Far Cry 2 gets the jitters, other games too)
    Increased power usage

    Generally the good points of OCing outweigh the bad ones.
     
  17. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Thanks for the input.
    Im having a lot of difficulty making a build. I look at
    two items basically identical except one is slightly
    more expensive and had some other one spec difference.
    Then i wonder, is the 30bucks worth it ?

    Such as :
    PCI Express 2.0 x16: 4 (@ x16/x8/x4/x8)
    PCI Express 2.0 x16: 2

    No idea what that is, or what difference it makes for 30bucks.
     
  18. FATALiiTYz

    FATALiiTYz New Member

    Messages:
    600
    Nahh, its not really worth it. I'd also stick to the Asus board that Jet recommended:D
     
  19. zuXi

    zuXi New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Unfortunately i cant find that mobo "P5T".. I chose the
    ASUS P6T http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131365
    Is it better than the P5T ? Considering i have to use the
    canadian site, in some categories i have less choices.

    Whats a good computer case ?
     
  20. Jet

    Jet VIP Member

    Messages:
    6,228
    Ha! Sorry, I typed P5T and meant P6T! That board or the one I linked earlier will do fine.

    Overclocking is generally safe, but you can make stuff break if you don't do it right. If you're overclocking, you'll need a decent motherboard (ie, the P6T or many others) and proper cooling for your processor. However, it will be nice down the road to have the extra performance--my i7 runs at 2.66Ghz stock, and right now it's at 4.1Ghz--all with the i7 920, the ASRock X58 Extreme, and 6GB of DDR3 1600.

    Solid states are more expensive because they're newer technology. Basically, you buy a smaller SSD (say, 64-120GB) for your Windows installation and programs, and then put the rest of your info on another regular hard drive (ie, the 1TB I linked earlier). The solid state drives are much quicker when doing things like opening programs, booting into windows, etc--the random access times are <.1ms while normal hard drives are usually 8ms-14ms.
     

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