Quiet Power Supply

Discussion in 'Computer Cases, Power Supplies and Cooling' started by finsfree, Sep 28, 2016.

  1. finsfree

    finsfree Member

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    Looking for a quiet power supply (700w and up) that won't break the bank. I need a lease 6 sata connections.

    Thanks,
     
  2. beers

    beers Moderator Staff Member

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    8,355
    What's your idea of quiet? Budget?

    This 1600G2 is pretty quiet ;)
     
  3. voyagerfan99

    voyagerfan99 Master of Turning Things Off and Back On Again Staff Member

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  4. Laquer Head

    Laquer Head Well-Known Member

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    6,226
    Interesting, I've never owned a 'loud', or what I would consider 'loud' PSU.

    I've have nothing but good luck and satisfaction with Corsair PSU's and that's all I use these days.
     
    Darren likes this.
  5. finsfree

    finsfree Member

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    277
    Thanks guys!

    I just have a cheap PSU and after about 20min it just gets super noisy.

    The wife is starting to notice....say no more....:rolleyes:
     
  6. Laquer Head

    Laquer Head Well-Known Member

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    6,226
    End of thread.... LOL:eek:
     
    C4C likes this.
  7. finsfree

    finsfree Member

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    277
    Turns out the CPU fan was clogged with dust bunnies. The heat sync was super HOT...burnt my finger.

    After cleaning it out...good to go!

    thanks guys,
     
  8. TrainTrackHack

    TrainTrackHack VIP Member

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    3,672
    That sounds nasty.

    Anyway, always check what's making the noise before buying anything if you're looking to quiet your PC down. I spent ~$100 on a set of noctua fans for my box a few years back, only to realise that the single most perceptible noise was made by the tiny ~6cm fan on my GPU. All the CPU, PSU, and all the case fans and 3 hard disks together didn't make noise as annoying as that shrill high pitched whining...
     
  9. beers

    beers Moderator Staff Member

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    8,355
    If it's a generic brand PSU, I'd probably upgrade it anyway.
     
  10. Intel_man

    Intel_man VIP Member

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    Unless you're running multi gpus, you don't need a 700W+ psu.
     
  11. killershark1978

    killershark1978 Member

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    But then there is been future proof with going for an OP power supply.

    I Purchased the Ultra X3 Pro 1000 Watts PSU many years ago as part of a complete new build at the time, not sure exactly how long ago this was but I recall using the NVIDIA GeForce 9800 GTX card back in that build and at the time, that was about as good a Graphics Card as you could get. I have rebuilt twice since then, and the only thing left that I have and am still currently using to this day from that old build is the Ultra X3 Pro 1000 Watts PSU that has yet to give me a single issue even now 3 builds later.
     
  12. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

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    12,092
    I predict PSU explosions in your future. Regardless of quality, that's a long time for a PSU. How many years we talking?
     
  13. killershark1978

    killershark1978 Member

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    Yep, I have to take my hat off to that PSU and the years of hassle free reliable service it has and continues to provide, I'm guess must be around 10 years give or take a couple, and still going strong, nothing wrong with it as reliable today as it was 10 years ago and I predict it will out survive this build and go into my next and still keep going long after, I think they will have to change from the ATX connection standards before I need another PSU. and my current set up is strong my friend, there is 3 years left in this third gen i5 build yet and maybe more, have only added a SSD since the original rebuild with the i5 and don't foresee anything in the close future to bring the need to move on. I think it was on the late stages of Windows 7 when I did my current build, went on and crushed Windows 8 and 8.1 soon after, although 8 was a hated OS I personally never had any issues with it, grew to kind of like it in fact, and now my system is crushing windows 10 running like a dream. and as for the PSU well that goes back to Windows XP.

    So yep I thing the decision to get the Ultra X3 Pro 1000w back then, even though I never have nor have to this day need for 1000 watts of power, always run decent G-cards have considered but have never had need for multi g-cards, in fact am glad I have never gone that route, one decent card, am on the Radeon HD 7870 which is still serving well, thought its usually graphics that trips me into a new build, but can still play any game I want with that card, am yet to find a game where I cant go ultra high still with setting, so why have 2 card? if you ask me a second card is a extra expense on a short term extra future fix, that by the time you get round to needing that extra power provided going cross fire or SLI, which will more often than not give you nothing of notice extra, there maybe the odd game where the developers have gone out there way to give you a pat on the back token of effort to add some worthless extra graphical feature if your system is cross fire or SLI, but more likely that the developers could not even be arsed to to even cater for such a feature and disregards it in there requirements to the point where if it actually causes a problem with the game running duel cards they will just ignore that and leave it to AMD / Nvidia to fix there own shit so there duel set ups work with there game not the other way round forcing new drivers that's fix may even be to turn that shit off during such given take so it actually works like it would have fine if only you never bothered with duel cards in the first place.

    But seriously if you ask me, a second card will give you nothing but brag rights to say to your friends you have duel cards, and by the time your g-card is dated, its dated even if you have duel, and there is something better out there already to go with instead that's going to run your entire system better with the right build around that single card, than having 2 of the older cards on a older build. So aside from running benchmark software witch is the only real place you will get your pat on the back for running duel cards, since bench mark developers are the only real developers out there that care enough about such features to actually use it, then yea I honestly feel that picking the right hardware at the right time and dodging the scammy features like cross over and SLI is the way go go my friend, for a long term healthy PC that just keeps going.
     
  14. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

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    12,092
    You do realize power supplies naturally degrade over time with usage, right? That's my point, I don't care what wattage or brand your pushing. Trying to "future proof" a power supply is laughable by nature, just make sure you get a decent wattage and unit and should last you fine.

    Also, what on earth is is the rest of that text wall? Get some organization with your posts because that seemed to be largely unnecessary rambling. Looks like your trying to defend your build/decisions even though neither me or anyone else criticized in the first place. Dual cards are definitely worthwhile in certain setups too, not that it's terribly relevant since the OP already fixed his problem.
     
    Intel_man likes this.
  15. Intel_man

    Intel_man VIP Member

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    5,710
    What you just said has zero relations to the reliability of a PSU. The amount of wattage a PSU produces have zero relations to the quality of the product.
     
    beers likes this.
  16. killershark1978

    killershark1978 Member

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    nope its a fact, that if you have a PSU capable of pushing so much more power than your ever going to give it, then you increase its chances of a long any health life span, XP was out when 2002, at a rough guess I would say had the same PSU now since not later than 2005, 2003, 2004 maybe, so somewhere between 10 - 15 years without any issue, never once had to change a single hardware component due to hardware failure, except once with a wireless network card and that was thanks to a driver issue and windows 8, so having an OP PSU in my experience seems like a good investment. will let you know though when / if it ever let me down, will make a point to try and remember specifically to visit this site just to say how long that PSU lasted me.

    In fact come to think thats not the only component still in there from back then, I still have the original 500GB Hard Drive, although its now one of 4 drives, and demoted to only used as a down target when downloading anything form the net, which give me a better idea of the date when I think about it because SATA was brand new at the time, so new I was debating over going with an IDE drive still, so must have been 2003.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2016
  17. beers

    beers Moderator Staff Member

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    8,355
    You can actually save money by replacing with a more modern active PFC unit which is much more efficient.

    Wattage alone doesn't take anything else from the ATX spec into account such as ripple or even simple shit such as what voltage you can provide x amount of watts on.

    If your PSU is from the mid 2000's then you likely have a lot of wattage on the 5V rail which has largely been deprecated (and is unusable capacity to your system).
     
    Darren likes this.
  18. killershark1978

    killershark1978 Member

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    Its modular so going on pure assumption, I would guess that any rails not in use are not using any power, and for the last 2 years, have been living in a brand new house now 2 years old, and one thing I have been thinking to myself all that time, is dam this place is energy efficient, its hard to say how much money exactly out of the entire household electrical budget goes on running my PC alone, but I have work it out that this entire house uses on average around £8 electric per week, so seriously if I was to go and get a new PSU, how much money per week do you think I would save out of that £8?
     
  19. beers

    beers Moderator Staff Member

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    8,355
    lol, spell out exactly how you arrived at this figure please.
     
    Laquer Head likes this.
  20. Intel_man

    Intel_man VIP Member

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    You're quite misinformed with how to determine a quality of a PSU.

    I can design you a 1000W power supply with cheap internal components. It'll have 1000W rated, and also have like 5A on the +12V rail. I can guarantee, your computer won't turn on.

    Wattage has ZERO relation to the durability of the unit. The better number to rely on is how much Amps the +12V rail can provide. The more Amps it can handle, the better the components normally need to be. You can have a 750W PSU giving you less than 30A in total on multiple +12V rails versus a 500W PSU giving you 50A on a single +12V rail. And I'll tell you the 500W PSU is the better product and under normal circumstances, last longer.

    You can really be scientific about it and figure out what specific internals it uses, but for regular joes, that's not gonna happen and not entirely necessary to determine the quality of a PSU.

    Typically, what you want to look for in a PSU, is to first find out how much wattage your system is using. Then, you proceed to look at different PSU's efficiency curve which provides you the maximum %-efficiency at the wattage you're consuming. Of course, when you narrow down the PSUs on the market down to a few select ones that provide you the maximum efficiency at the wattage you're consuming, I'd normally choose the brand with the better warranty (incl. customer support and honouring the warranty without being a hassle) and/or higher Amp rating on the +12V rail.

    Again, none of what you said here have any relations with the wattage of a PSU.
     
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