Video Storage Space

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras, Webcams and Scanners' started by Ardy, Mar 10, 2016.

  1. Ardy

    Ardy Member

    Messages:
    56
    Hello,

    I was editing some videos and I exported the file as an MPEG-4 at 1920x1080 60 FPS. The video was approx. 17 minutes and took up 3GB of space. Why is this? I've seen HD videos that are two hours long and only 500MBs. Also, is this normal though?

    I included a screenshot of my export settings here and here so you could maybe see what's wrong with it.



    Thanks
     
  2. beers

    beers Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,579
    Most captured files are uncompressed.
     
  3. spirit

    spirit Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    17,322
    You exported at a high bit rate which is the video is so large.
     
  4. Geoff

    Geoff VIP Member

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    37,674
    You exported your video at 28,000Kbps. As a comparison if you have a 1080p ~2 hour movie that averages 1.5-2GB, they are only around 2,000Kbps.
     
  5. Ardy

    Ardy Member

    Messages:
    56
    OK. So are these settings too high then?

    Thanks

    Ardy
     
  6. Geoff

    Geoff VIP Member

    Messages:
    37,674
    It's too high if you want a smaller file. You can also use a program such as Handbrake to compress the videos to lower bitrate.
     
  7. Ardy

    Ardy Member

    Messages:
    56
    OK. I would prefer quality over video size. Is there any way to get 0% quality loss with a lower bitrate and an uncompressed file?

    Thanks

    Ardy
     
  8. Ardy

    Ardy Member

    Messages:
    56
    Also, what are the benefits of a higher bitrate?
     
  9. Geoff

    Geoff VIP Member

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    37,674
    Better quality.
     
  10. Ardy

    Ardy Member

    Messages:
    56
    Yes. But at what point does using a higher bitrate stop improving your video quality?

    Thanks for the help so far,

    Ardy
     
  11. beers

    beers Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,579
    How do you propose this actually being a thing? Also, if it existed then it would already be the current standard.
     
  12. Ardy

    Ardy Member

    Messages:
    56
    What I was talking about was basically what I said in my next post.

    "at what point does using a higher bitrate stop improving your video quality?"

    For example does a bitrate or 100000kb/s make a difference rather than using 35000kb/s or 28000kb/s.

    How do you calculate the lowest bitrate to use was basically what I was saying.
     
  13. Geoff

    Geoff VIP Member

    Messages:
    37,674
    The increase in quality stops when the bitrate is the same as that of the original video. If you recorded video at 40,000Kbps, going higher won't net you anything but a larger size.

    The difference in quality depends on what you want to do with the video. As you lower the bitrate, you make the file smaller but you will start to see more and more artifacts and loss of overall quality as you continue to go lower. It's really a personal opinion as to how important the ratio of quality/file size is for you.
     
  14. Ardy

    Ardy Member

    Messages:
    56
    Ok. And how do I know what bitrate I have recorded at?

    Do I just check in the properties of the video?

    Also, how come when I export at 35000 kb/s, the video file's properties on the bitrate shown by Windows does not equal that number?

    Thanks for the info,

    Ardy
     
  15. Geoff

    Geoff VIP Member

    Messages:
    37,674
    Yes that's what I would do. And how far off is it? Depending on the encoder, it's not uncommong to set 40,000Kbps and have it record at 39,995Kbps for instance. If it's far off, you may have selected a variable bit rate.
     
  16. Ardy

    Ardy Member

    Messages:
    56
    OK.

    The program that I export with locks the bitrate setting at "variable".
    So what does this do?

    Also, in the Windows properties for my original video, it says "Data Rate" and "Total Bitrate" what's the difference?

    Thanks for the help,

    Ardy
     

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