WIndows 10 Where is the pressure point?

Discussion in 'Desktop Computers' started by ssal, Dec 13, 2019.

  1. ssal

    ssal Active Member

    Messages:
    534
    I have the following built.

    AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Processor
    ASRock MicroATX Motherboard (B450M PRO4)
    Corsair LPX 32GB (2x16GB) 3200MHz C16 DDR4 DRAM Memory Kit
    Seagate BarraCuda 2TB Internal Hard Drive HDD – 3.5 Inch SATA 6Gb/s 7200 RPM
    HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive
    COUGAR MX330 Mid-Tower Case
    ZOTAC GeForce GTX 1060 DirectX 12 ZT-P10620A-10M 6GB 192-Bit GDDR5X PCI Express 3.0 HDCP Ready Video Card
    EVGA - 600W ATX 12V/EPS 12V 80 Plus Power Supply - Black
    LG Internal SATA 24x DVD CD +/-R & RW DL Disc Burner Re-Writer Drive OEM Bulk

    I built this computer solely for the purpose of furthering my video editing. I use Adobe CC Premiere Pro and After Effects.

    I am quite happy with the performance in PP and Media Encoder. The encoding is pretty fast, averaging minute to minute of 4K HQ video. I am able to scrub the video back and forth and able to see the effects I applied.

    While editing in PP, the CPU shows high usage but it doesn't get stuck at maximum. The GPU shows 25% usage. Ram is used about 60-75%.

    While encoding (exporting the finished video), GPU and memory again shows moderate usage, but CPU is stuck at 95-100%.

    In After Effects, both CPU and GPU show moderate usage (not peaking), the process seems to halt while waiting for caching and memory usage creeps from 30% moving upwards. The process would start to move after the memory usage is max'ed out.

    Based on the above observation, would you agree with my conclusion on the pressure points . . .

    1. A faster (more core, more thread and higher mhz) CPU would improve performance.

    2. Double the memory to 64gb would improve performance.

    3. Upgrading to Geforce GTX 1080 8gb would not yield significant benefit.

    Thank you for your input.
     
  2. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

    Messages:
    1,369
    I have used Premiere Pro a bit, I found that the use of gpu hardware acceleration was very limited and only helped when using certain effects, since I using very few my gpu had little to do. A few years ago I bought an rx470 for an old system, the 470 has hardware accerleration that supports playback of 4k h.265 so I could watch my gopro videos. I'm sure there's a good reason why, but it seems most editing software is unable to use the hardware accerleration on the gpu for playback, which meant I could watch my 4k vids smoothly with players like vlc, but then it would stutter like crazy when scrubbing through the video in Premiere Pro. I did run tests in pp to make sure hardware accerleration was working correctly, after a lot of research I found out hardware accerleration was only being used in certain situations and playback wasn't one of then. Note this was all a few years ago, maybe things have changed.
    For pp I would want the best cpu possible for smooth playback, then it would depend on how much my editing could be helped by gpu hardware accerleration, my workload is hardly helped at all by the the gpu so I wouldn't need anything fancy, but I imagine people using a lot of effects that support hardware acceleration a good gpu might help a lot.
    So I guess what I'm saying is it depends on the situation and what you want to do.
     
  3. ssal

    ssal Active Member

    Messages:
    534
    Yes, PP doesn't utilize the GPU too much. I think it's all about CPU speed and the number of cores and threads. I think the Ryzen 7 2700x is good enough for the scrubbing. I am not a heavy video editor so I am not taxing the system to the extreme.

    I actually find the Nvme SSD helps a lot because video editing require constant read and write to the drive and the Mvme SSD is 16x to 20x faster HHD. I don't have any problem playing back 4K video even on my 3rd generation i7 laptop.

    I am not into H.265 yet and may never be. I think [email protected] and 100mbps is good enough quality for me.
     
  4. dave39

    dave39 Member

    Messages:
    56
    Open up your task manager and click on the performance tab. While you are working, hover mouse over task manager tab to peek at it. You will see the real-time utilization of your components
     

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