Fan bearing in PSU bad?

Discussion in 'Computer Cases, Power Supplies and Cooling' started by The VCR King, Apr 12, 2018.

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  1. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

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    Sorry, but you clearly should realize know how little you know on the subject, so why spread misinformation, please stick to the facts you know.
     
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  2. jevery

    jevery Member

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    I've put a new fan in a PSU. Snip, solder, cover with heat shrink, and secure fan. Don't touch anything other than chassis. Not difficult. The harder part is roughly matching the RPM, CFM. dB, and mounting holes. I had to Dremel the mounting holes of the fan to match the nonstandard (?), original.
     
  3. Agent Smith

    Agent Smith Well-Known Member

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    The average human body comprises of about 60-70 percent water, and you are telling me skin is a bloody insulator? You're an Internet know nothing, bud.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018 at 5:46 AM
  4. Agent Smith

    Agent Smith Well-Known Member

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    Ever try that science experiment in science class where the teacher has everyone hold hands and the teacher sends like 50KV with very low amperage through everyone and the last person gets the greatest shock?
     
  5. gillmanjr

    gillmanjr Member

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    No I haven't done that personally, but I know why that occurs. BTW, saying the teacher "sends 50kV with very low amperage" is not proper terminology, just an FYI. The teacher has no control over the amperage in that scenario, the teacher is applying a voltage ACROSS the students, the amperage created depends on the amount of voltage applied and the total resistance of the students. Think of voltage as the equivalent of a pressure drop in a water piping system. When you create a pressure difference in a water system, it forces the water to flow. How much flow depends on the magnitude of the pressure drop, the size of the piping, friction, etc. In an electrical circuit the amperage is the flow, it is created by the voltage applied and the amount of amperage you get depends on the resistance of the circuit (which is basically equivalent to the diameter of a pipe and the friction loss). Google "Ohm's Law", its electrical engineering 101. Its a bit more complicated with AC systems, but the concept still applies.

    It is actually amazing how similar a DC electrical circuit is to a piping system with water. The equations are different, of course, but there are a lot of similarities in general. A water pump, for example, is the equivalent of a battery or generator. Placing pumps in series vs. in parallel has a very similar effect on water pressure as placing batteries or generators in series or in parallel has on voltage. Same thing for the overall configuration a piping system vs a circuit. This makes electricity much easier to conceptualize for a lot of people. Again, AC circuits change the whole game because there is no mechanical equivalent to alternating current (or three phase power), but it works for simple single phase DC circuits.

    By the way, another FYI for you...pure water (distilled) is actually an insulator. Its the impurities (dissolved solids) in water that cause it to become a conductor. It is true that our internals (mostly water as you correctly stated) do not provide that much electrical resistance (only a few hundred ohms I believe), it is our skin that provides most of the resistance. If you had open wounds on your hands and were to apply voltage in the wounds, you might be in trouble. Same thing if you stuck it in your mouth or on your tongue, you'd have severe injuries, even from 120V.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018 at 4:09 PM
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  6. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

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    Alright guys, drop it. You've more than derailed this as is. I'm just going to lock it if it continues.
     
  7. aldan

    aldan Active Member

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    are you freaking serious???get a grip and admit that there are some things you dont know.by the way,water itself is not the best conductor of electricity.its the minerals ie salt that help out there.a capacitor stores a charge and once the charge is released it poses no danger at all unless recharged.any fool that can read would be able to confirm this.and as for your little science experiment,its the salt and moisture on our skin that conducts the current,not the skin itself.hey darren,id probably close this pointless discussion myself.lol
     
  8. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

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    Correct, I thank you for sharing your knowledge on this subject.
    Sincerely, with all due respect

    Computers only function because of electricity and therefore I believe a VERY important part of this forum, misinformation must be corrected when facts are concerned.

     
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  9. porterjw

    porterjw Moderator Staff Member

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    And we're done here...
     
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