Sad, Sad SSD

Discussion in 'Computer Memory and Hard Drives' started by AlienMenace, Apr 11, 2019.

  1. AlienMenace

    AlienMenace Well-Known Member

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    1,046
    I am not a happy camper, since December 26, 2018. I have lost 4% of health on the new Crucial MX500 500gb SSD that I got for a Christmas present. And this is the system drive. :mad:

    SDD Problem.jpg
     
    slackercruster likes this.
  2. _Kyle_

    _Kyle_ Well-Known Member

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    1,004
    You probably just lost the silicon lottery. Those drives have really good reviews.
     
  3. slackercruster

    slackercruster Member

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    Wow, where do you get that drive checking software?

    I had 3 SSD's. One was bad right out of the box. Another one died in a few days. 3rd, a 250gb, is still going. (But can't say about how fast it is dying.)
     
  4. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    562
    Reviews really mean nothing, in my view. A product that enjoys a high number of reviews just tells me that the product is popular, nothing more. I personally don't think a high number of positive or negative reviews reliably correlates with the quality of the product.

    What kind of workloads are you subjecting the drive to?

    I really wouldn't take the health rating seriously.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2019
  5. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

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    12,091
    I'll agree on disregarding the health rating but come on... reviews are definitely not worthless. Sure you should take it all with a grain of salt and keep in mind the vast majority of people don't review products when they're good, but outright ignoring them seems shortsighted.
     
  6. AlienMenace

    AlienMenace Well-Known Member

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    1,046
    I think in my opinion, that the workload is light. The drive is my system drive, pretty much Windows and App/programs. Everything else goes to my other 2 Crucial SSD's. Another 500gb and a 1 Tb. I only have used 59.0gb used on the 500gb C: drive. I play only 2 games, Township, and World of Warships and they sit on the d: drive. D: drive-500gb, E: drive 1tb and I still have my Ozc vertex 4 128gb that I replaced with the 500gb SSD and that is 89% after 6 yrs of use. I will continue to check it from time to time. Maybe this summer I will grab a 250gb for the system drive and do a clean install then. And use the 500gb till it craps out. I'm on a set income so I can't afford it now.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2019
  7. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

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    12,091
    You're not even using the Crucial software to measure this so I'd safely ignore what Crystal Disk reports. Install the Crucial software (forget what it is but have it on my home machine) and check it there.
     
  8. AlienMenace

    AlienMenace Well-Known Member

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    1,046
    True, but I also have the Crucial Software on the computer and just updated it today. And it also says 96%. I'm not really worried about it, just saying 4% gone in a few months, when it took 6 yrs on the Vertex 4, lol. The Cyrstal Disk Info program is just prettier.
     
    Darren likes this.
  9. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

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    1,332
    I have never bothered to look at the health of my drives before, but as I have had many ssd's over the years it might be interesting to see how they stood up to the test of time.

    2014 OCZ Vertex 3 - 23000+ hours 100%

    vertex 3.png

    Samsung 850 - 4000+ hours 100%

    samsung 850.png

    Samsung 850 - 6800+ hours 100%

    samsung 850 2.png

    Kingston 480 - 5400+ hours Good

    king 480.png

    Sandisk Ultra 2 480 - 150+ hours (this seems to have been reset) 100%
    This drive failed and no bios could see it, I let it sit for a few months and now it works perfectly.

    sandisk 480.png

    Somewhere I have an old Vertex 2 and ADATA ssd I would like to test...………..when I find them.
     
  10. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    562
    I don't think it's shortsighted. Determining the quality of a product by utilizing reviews is not a reliable method; It's simply not consistent enough and there are too many variables. I think reviews can actually hurt good products more than it can help.

    It's possibly an error or bug. Did you update the SSD firmware?
     
  11. AlienMenace

    AlienMenace Well-Known Member

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    1,046
    Yes, they all have the latest firmware in them.
     
  12. TheRealSwede

    TheRealSwede Member

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    83
    Do not forget that ANY computer device might be ruined the moment you lay your hand on it! IF YOU DO NOT USE ESD-PROTECTION IN A PROPER WAY!
    That means attaching the end of an ESD wrist strap to a metal part of your computer (that does NOT have the powercord connected)
    And putting on the wriststrap onto your self BEFORE opening the ESD-bag with your component in it...

    In not handled properly your new components may get broken before you even get to use it..
    And YES! This applies to hardrives too… SSD or not...
     
  13. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

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    12,091
    I've literally never used an ESD and worked on thousands of computers and never fried anything. Almost anybody that worked repair will tell you the same. Ground yourself, easy.

    Not sure why you're even bringing it up, has nothing to do with this.
     
  14. TheRealSwede

    TheRealSwede Member

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    83
    Well that is the thing... your components does not get FRIED.. they get small faults that slowly grow with age..
    And to work with "thousands of computers" and not use, even a cheap ESD wrist-strap, is totally irresponsible..

    Others pay you to do work on their expensive computer and you risk ruining it... That is crasy (I suppose you don´t keep "thousands of computers" at home for your personal use, so you must work on computers that others own..)

    And Yet again! In the early 90´s you seldom used ESD-protection (you did not know better then) But this knowledge has grown since then, today EVERY PROFESSIONAL TECH USES ESD-PROTECTION.
    Today when every component in every chip is WAY much smaller than they where back in the 90´s, and they are also much more sensitive to ESD.

    I for one would NOT let you fiddle with any computer of mine after your statement… Like your comment makes away with the issue of ESD! Any trained tech has ben told to ALWAYS use ESD-protection.. And it´s not an option, it is a MUST DO!

    You only think that you have not caused any damage, but you really do not know if you had or not!
    And grounding your self has nothing to do with ESD-protection, I know since i have been trained in ESD while working for Swedens then biggest distributor of electronic components, who sell components to space labs, telecom companies and so on, who all has a strict ESD-policy..

    (If anyone is interested, Read more about ESD here)
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
  15. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,091
    I'm not saying it isn't a possibility but anybody that's handled hardware knows that the chances are slim to nil. Sometimes it's best to go with real world experience and I'll stand by that. I worked in a shop, refurbished thousands of machines, repaired hundreds. ESD wasn't ever an issue and my boss actually laughed when I asked if an ESD strap was necessary when I started.

    The likelihood of frying an SSD from ESD (particularly one that gets installed once and has been working fine) is basically zero. Your alarmist narrative is just exhausting and bringing it up here just seems flat weird.

    And just because you like links so much, here's the first hit on needing an Anti Static band. IFixIt is arguably the leader in the repair biz in terms of reference and you'll see most there echo my sentiment. Many users that have done it much longer than I.

    https://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View...ti-static+strap-mat+for+dismantling+a+desktop

    Edit: Saw your edit. You're gonna have to explain how grounding yourself doesn't affect ESD. That's a new one for sure.
     
  16. TheRealSwede

    TheRealSwede Member

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    That is so sad.. To learn that you, today, still rely on knowledge and methods from the early PC-Stoneage..
    Most people (me incl.) started out this way in the 90´s so I know your way of thinking.. I was like you back then!

    Most people from that time has adapted to these new knowledges, new standards and new methods and grown as techs. Despite not doing so "back then", today they all do protect their customers electronics by using ESD-protection..

    That is the REAL WORLD difference in TRUE PROFESSIONALS and.... umm.. "others.."
    That is still how they did it in the early PC-stoneage, And it was wrong then, and is even more wrong today...
    I´m really sad that you cant grasp the realities of today! That you still think 30-year old knowledge to be "topnotch" today!

    I find that comment offensive and not appropriate at all.. But judging by your other comments I understand that you simply can not do better.. I think you find it weird that people invented the wheel, and that you find it weird whenever anyone tells you that you should wear a seatbelt while driving!
    I find it even more sad that you keep bringing your old fashion "knowhow" as being the only truth, and that you actually think that everyone should perform just like you have done the last 30yrs or so..

    Since the mid 90´s every professional is required to use ESD-protection..
    It is so sad that you simply can not understand that your way of thinking is way outdated..
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
  17. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

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    12,091
    I'm still waiting on this.

    I hope you realize I was created in the mid 1990's. My view isn't the least bit outdated, it's just different than yours. You're clearly old school trained and stick to the book and what you've seen. Which is fine but I see so many older tech people just get absolutely stuck in how they do something and don't use intuition and their own gut when a lot of times that's going to get you way farther than what the book may tell you or how you've been doing it for 20 years. ESD can happen yes, but on consumer grade products, getting all up in arms about it is just overkill. You pretty much denounced all of my technical training because I don't use a static band? Like, really?

    I do apologize if I'm coming across a bit... rough... I just feel like so many of your posts are just rehashing of the same handful of things (hell your motherboard post was copy pasted) and you just link generic things and don't actually say how or why you think something, just that you read it. Really hurts your credibility, at least from outside looking in, and the install book you keep pushing just cracks me up.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019
  18. TheRealSwede

    TheRealSwede Member

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    83
    Nope! It nothing new at all, ESD is about SLOWLY evening the different charges, that is what protects sensitive electronics..
    Grounding is a FAST JOLT of discharge.. It has nothing to do with ESD-protection..
    You would know if you ever learned about ESD-protection… Like the professional techs has done!
     
  19. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,091
    Erm.... grounding discharged electricity makes it so that you don't have any electricity to transfer from your body into components.

    I'm asking you to explain something so I can see your side and you just flat refuse and act demeaning. Got it.
     
  20. TheRealSwede

    TheRealSwede Member

    Messages:
    83
    No! I´m not the one to tell you how ESD and ESD-protection works..

    But to other readers I might explain!
    when you use for example a: ESD-wriststrap (and connect it to a bare metalpart in your computer) it will SLOWLY even the electrostatic chargelevels between you and the computer, When you then grab the ESD-bag the wristrap will SLOWLY adjusts all these charge levels to be equal.. (no damage to the component inside the ESD-bag)
    And now, when you, the computer and the component (In the ESD-protective bag) all have the SAME chargelevel, that is when you may remove the bag and safely install the component without causing any damage, as long as you keep wearing the wriststrap and it remains connected to a bare metalpart of your computer...

    Grounding yourself is always a quick discharge (causes damage), hense it has nothing to do With ESD-protection at all..
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2019

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