Sad, Sad SSD

Discussion in 'Computer Memory and Hard Drives' started by AlienMenace, Apr 11, 2019.

  1. zeppelin04

    zeppelin04 Member

    Messages:
    491
    I know it's off topic, but I find those wrist straps annoying. Once I saw how resilient a lot of the tech is now I stopped using one and just touch metal every now and again. No problems yet. I just don't rub parts on my carpet or have my cats help with the build.
     
    Darren likes this.
  2. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,045
    I don't even.... What.

    You discharge by touching something, you have no electricity to even move into a component.... Discharging doesn't cause damage if you don't.. ya know.. discharge on the component itself. Touch the bare metal, static gone.

    I don't even know why I care at this point, I'm just baffled at your way of communicating and refusal to actually explain yourself when I ask for it.
     
  3. TheRealSwede

    TheRealSwede Member

    Messages:
    76
    The sad thing is that you still refuse to trust modern science..
    You are acting like ESD and ESD-protection is just as made up as star wars or archiveX or similar..

    ESD and ESD-protection is a reality, so stop fighting it.. a ESD-wriststrap costs less than $3 so its not like it cost a fortune..

    and every professional tech has since the 90´s seen ESD-protection as the NORM.. And you still claim you know better?? Come on... You know you are fighting a battle you simply can´t win!

    You only make people scared of going to their small local computer tech, because now they NOW these guys WILL ruin their expensive computers by refusing to adapt to todays standards.. because they are to "proud" to wear a simple $3 wrist-strap…
     
  4. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,045
    I give up, again you're not even actually answering what I'm asking but skating around it and poorly veiled insults.

    The strap be dammed. Explain how grounding yourself does not eliminate ESD when handling hardware. Because everything I've ever seen says it does, and this is the consensus I find online. If you're so damn educated, share with the class how grounding yourself on a case doesn't eliminate ESD.
     
  5. _Kyle_

    _Kyle_ Active Member

    Messages:
    967
    Hey, Swede, I've got an experiment for you.

    Go find any rug, and wearing socks, drag your feet across it several times until you feel really tingly.

    Now go find something metal and touch it. You will physically feel all of the static electricity leaving your body. Heck, you might even see a spark.


    Afterwards, reflect about what you just proved.
     
  6. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    Did you know that when an aircraft is in flight it is continuously rubbing against the atmosphere and this rubbing causes static charge to build up in the air frame and this is why they are grounded using a cable to discharge any static build-up before and during refueling and defueling. Grounding an object and discharging its static charge would seem to be one of the major points of ESD-protection, and the other would be to preventative, stopping build up from occurring.
     
  7. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    Everything in the pc is grounded through the PSU's earth wire, this is used to trip circuits cutting power and to safely direct current away, this also works to discharge static. Every time you unplug and move your computer around you will likely be giving it a static charge, by your logic plugging it in again and grounding it is going to cause a fast static discharge damaging the computer.
    You talk about ESD but have yet to mention resistance or insulation, maybe the most important factors to consider when talking about static. Static builds up because an object has too much resistance around it (insulated), electricity moves like water though the path of least resistance, but if the resistance is too high then it is unable to move and builds until it is able to overcome that resistance, this means the object is insulated by an insulator. When using a wrist strap connected to a pc you create a path of low resistance as the wire has a much lower resistance than skin, clothing or whatever else is likely to be connecting between you and the pc or its components, so static can move between you and the pc through the wire and not potentially sensitive components. Static does not damage components over time, anyway static will be discharged as soon as the pc in plugged in through the psu earth, static causes damage by flowing through a component which enough current to cause it damage. To cause damage the current would need to be strong enough and it would have to be taking the path of least resistance through the component and a specific part sensitive enough to be damaged, for this to happen you would need to be very unlucky. Components come in ESD bags because packaging is not usually very conductive (insulator), in transit the packaging and contents move and rub against each other causing static charge to build up which may be discharge in a way that could cause damage once opened, an ESD bag keeps that static off the component. As far as I know stasis does not move slowly and gently, it builds up until it overcomes resistance and discharges, I imagine as its electricity it moves at the same speed.
     
  8. Cromewell

    Cromewell Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,360
    You do understand that the purpose of an ESD strap is to ground yourself right?

    Unless you are working on extremely sensitive equipment touching the case, or other metal is sufficient to discharge built up static before handling components.
     
    Darren likes this.
  9. johnb35

    johnb35 Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    41,658
    Damn.... this is a lot of nonsense. I've been building systems for 20 years and have never used a wrist strap and have never ruined any part. Just WOW.
     
    Darren, AlienMenace and _Kyle_ like this.
  10. aldan

    aldan Active Member

    Messages:
    589
    bullshit.its a ground and nothing more.you can call it what you want but it is what it is.and i see this thread "Slowly" devolving.lol
     
    Darren likes this.
  11. zeppelin04

    zeppelin04 Member

    Messages:
    491
    I like to wear two straps and link the clamps together. That way I know both wrists are safe from faults.
     
  12. _Kyle_

    _Kyle_ Active Member

    Messages:
    967
    Swede's Logic:


    The user
    upload_2019-4-17_20-11-37.jpeg


    The computer
    upload_2019-4-17_20-10-33.jpeg
     
    JLuchinski, OmniDyne and zeppelin04 like this.
  13. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

    Messages:
    545
    I like to run bare 8 gauge copper wire directly from the wall outlet ground and wrap it around my wrist as I work on my computer and I cover my entire workspace in anti-static wrap. Finally, I put an anti-static bag over my head and tie it closed so I don't exhale on my valuable PC parts.

    Wrist straps are so obsolete.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2019
  14. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,045
    I feel lack of oxygen might be a larger concern than ESD at that point.
     
    OmniDyne likes this.
  15. Shlouski

    Shlouski VIP Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    ESD bags also discharge oxygen build up in the atmosphere straight into the body once you come in contact with them, duh do u not know anything!
     
  16. Darren

    Darren Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    12,045
    Guess I'm relying on all that early 90's training I got...?
     
    JLuchinski and Shlouski like this.
  17. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

    Messages:
    545
    Bro, when it comes down to ESD protection or oxygen, I choose suffocation.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2019
    JLuchinski likes this.

Share This Page