Trying Linux Mint

Discussion in 'Operating Systems' started by OmniDyne, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    Booting Linux Mint Cinnamon from a USB drive. If I like it, I think I'll dual boot from now on, and probably eventually replace Windows.
     
  2. beers

    beers Moderator Staff Member

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    Okay.
     
  3. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    You're so edgy.
     
  4. Deerling7

    Deerling7 Active Member

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    So, how is Linux Mint?
     
  5. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

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    Welcome to GNU/Linux. :) I have been a Linux user for years, but made the full time switch to Linux upon the release of Windows 10. If you have any questions, need of program alternative suggestions, et cetera I'm happy to help.
     
  6. multi-tasker-X

    multi-tasker-X Member

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    i've been using it for almost 2 years,

    i will probably never go back to windows

    took me a while to get used to the terminal, it was scary and frustrating at first, the more i use linux, the more i love the terminal,

    i do have a windows desktop, but i use it for gaming only, my main desktop and all my other desktops and laptops use linux

    i think the biggest problem was that i started using ubunutu, it difficult to get around ubunutu, their menu is confusing,

    mint is awesome
     
  7. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

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    Have you tried Proton yet? It might just let you replace Windows. I have gotten just about every game I have thrown at it working. It honestly could replace Windows for a lot of people in the gaming area.

    One of my latest Windows games I've been playing on Linux. All from a click of install on Steam and no modifying anything.


    Ubuntu Unity or Gnome? Only curious as to the horrors you faced. :p

    They both are horrible to me, but heck all DE's are basically horrible to me now. I am a WM person. Regardless, Unity was better in some ways than Gnome Shell. At least you didn't have hot corners on by default. uugh... Gnome is slightly more able to be customized than Unity, but customizing Gnome-Shell is like customizing Windows. (In other words not much you can do). Which I think they both used Nautilus so another horrible thing to me, lol.
     
  8. multi-tasker-X

    multi-tasker-X Member

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    I haven't tried Proton, I'll have to try it in the future. I also heard steam is working on a linux client,

    but even if i got steam working, i still need dolphin-emulator and it doesn't work good on linux, most updates are made for windows,

    i was able to replace 98% of the windows programs except for gaming applications, skype and another chat service,

    but actually i use a windows virtual machine for those few programs, and my windows 10 gaming machine is attached on the second port of the monitor, i rarely play games so it's not a big deal to have a second desktop


    Im not sure if unity or gnome, but this is what i was using,
    ubuntu_14.04_search_applications-100657403-primary.idge.jpg


    the worst thing about it is that its hard to get around, if they just had a normal menu like windows or linux mint, then i would of kept using it,
    the interface drove me away, right now my linux mint interface is simple, i love it


    what i hated about windows is i always have to download programs for anything simple, and i always ended up getting virus because you have to download third party programs and its all virus and spamware,

    for example, in windows i wanted to rip steaming music, i had to download third party software and it takes a long time to find one and most of them arent free

    on linux i just have to type this in the terminal and it works!
    x = ip

    streamripper http://xx.xx.xx.xx:xxxx


    boom! im ripping online music,


    so easy, i find most things are easy on linux and most of all,,, free!
     
  9. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    196
    I'm sure I'm going to have lots of questions haha. I love Mint's UI. I no longer play games, and my computer is basically just for media now. I plan on replacing Windows on my SSD soon, as Mint is really neat, and I don't think I'll have any issues doing a full conversion.

    I experimented with it a bit through the USB live version, and was attempting to fix a driver issue with the Netgear wifi adapter I have, and I couldn't get it to work. I was also getting screen tearing, even after updating the driver.

    Not sure what's up with that, but maybe it's because I was using a live version?
     
  10. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

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    The Live CD/USB isn't an actual install on the metal. (or in other words the computer). It's not really made to be your main install, but just a look into how it could run on your machine. Installing stuff via there vs from the physical hardware can be night and day. Specially speed wise as you're not locked into the slow read and write speeds of a disc or USB thumb drive. Another thing is the Live CD/USB isn't going to have the newer patches the actual install of the OS has.

    What video card are you using? Also, have you tried using a compositor? (such as Compton).
     
  11. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    196
    Ah ok, that's what I figured.

    GTX 970. No, I haven't.
     
  12. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

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    196
    Got the new SSD in. Time to install Mint. Ext 4 and I'm not really sure about the swap partition, though. I saw arguments on both sides and neither seemed to give a clear answer on whether it's necessary/ harmful.
     
  13. UnholyVision

    UnholyVision Member

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    I personally do not use swap in builds that have more than 8GB of ram. Because those builds with 8GB or less, I don't really use as a massive work horse per se. Then for some reason I did go over the 8GB or less ram the HDD would take over. Which prevents my system from shutting applications down to allocate more room in the memory. Honestly, in my opinion most people don't need swap. It's hard to fill up 10GB+ ram even when video rendering, 3D modeling, et cetera. (I use Blender, Kdenlive, Cinelerra-GG, Flowblade, Gimp, web browsers, et cetera all at the same time on my 32GB ram machine. Well not all rendering at once, but open with filled time-lines, filters, previews, and much more. Yet I have a hard time hitting 20gb without a bit more heavy lifting).

    Edit: I would say if you're unsure, just start out with a swap partition, do some normal daily tasks. Then check a task manager or just use the command, "free -m" to see your memory usage. (The command will also show your swap usage). If you're not hitting anywhere close to your memory ram limit then you might want to disable and remove swap. "swapoff -a", use a program such as, "gnome-disk-utility" or "GParted" to delete and resize the allocated space into say your home partition. After that just edit your fstab. "sudo nano /etc/fstab" (change nano to your choice of text editor) and delete the entry pertaining to swap.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2018
    OmniDyne likes this.
  14. OmniDyne

    OmniDyne Active Member

    Messages:
    196
    I'm definitely not a power user, so I'll probably just go without using swap. Even when gaming and having multiple Chrome tabs open, I've never used over 8GB of RAM.

    And since I won't game in Mint, I doubt I'll touch anywhere near 8 gigs.
     

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