Power Supply (PSU) Tech Guide

Discussion in 'Computer Cases, Power Supplies and Cooling' started by linkin, Nov 25, 2010.

  1. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    This guide will aim at updating the existing guides on powersupplies which have not seen activity in some time.

    Most of the research has been done in the two previous threads which I will link in this guide. Since then, we have new powersupplies and new components, and thus new power requirements. Let's begin.

    Part One

    Powersupplies are the most important component in a computer, besides the motherboard. They are the lifeblood of the system. The heart of a human body, if you will. Many, if not all, cheap and nasty powersupplies are based on older systems, which mainly use the +5v rail. This is untrue of today's systems, which use mainly the +12v rail.

    Bad Powersupplies

    Cheap and nasty powersupplies, as well as being based on outdated and no longer used designs, have no surge protection, no over voltage or over current protection, no under voltage or under current protection, and are massively overrated in wattage and amperage, and have no PFC, active or passive. They may have passive or no cooling. They will die in one power surge, one lightning strike, or whenever they generally feel like kicking the bucket.

    These are the power supplies that plague online and retail stores in sheer quantity and low price. They are to be avoided at all costs. You get what you pay for. They are also much too common in prebuilt machines, as they are not designed to be upgraded, the manufacturer adopts a "one size fits all" approach.

    Also note that many cheap powersupplies are light in weight, due to having less essential components. While not a deciding factor, weight can play a part in choosing a good or bad powersupply. If you do compare this way (which I do not recommend) you need to check the weight of the unit itself, not the whole retail box and all of its accessories.

    The worst thing about these powersupplies is that when they fail, they will take other components out with them. This means replacing most or all of your components because one bad component failed. The same goes for poor quality motherboards with poor quality VRM's.

    It may cost you $20 to buy that power supply at the time, but replacing your fried motherboard, processor, hard drive, video card, sound card, and optical drive will cost you hundreds of dollars or more. It is better to pay for a higher quality powersupply than risk all of your components, especially if the computer in question is needed to be run 24/7, as a server or otherwise.

    Good Powersupplies

    Good powersupplies have Active PFC, Over-voltage and Over-current protection, Under-voltage and Under-current protection, are 80Plus Bronze certified at minimum, have appropriate connections for their wattage, are not rated at peak usage, and can handle the load it says it can on the sticker. They have good cooling, have some decent weight to them, and are generally bigger in size, and have thicker gauge wires required to deliver power properly without heating up or melting.

    Bear in mind that wattage is not the only factor in choosing a powersupply, in fact it is one of the last things to consider. Amperage is very important. Cheap powersupplies on old designs generally have low +12v amperage which is problematic for today's systems, as most components draw power from the +12v rail(s)

    PSU's based on older designs have the majority of their power available on the +5v rail. This is important if you are looking for a powersupply for an older system. You need to choose appropriately.

    Power Supply Rails

    Every power supply takes your 220/240v or 110v/120v AC input (depending on where you live) and converts it to +/-12v, +/-5v and +/-3.3V DC for output. Modern power supplies are essentially +12v only, with transformers that filter it down to +5v and +3.3v for appropriate use. This improves efficiency & power stability as the unit essentially only has to create one voltage.


    With single rail powersupplies, it generally doesn't matter where you plug your hardware into, as long as it's the correct plug, and you're not exceeding the maximum rated wattage and amperage for that particular voltage rail.

    With true multi rail power supplies, you do have to be careful not to put all peripherals onto one rail, but divide them up to balance the load. Otherwise it's like putting all of a ships cargo stacked up on the rear of the ship. It's going to cause problems.

    Useful links regarding power supply rails:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supply_rail

    http://www.playtool.com/pages/psumultirail/multirails.html

    Part Two

    Below is a table of graphics cards and minimum/recommended powersupply specs for them. This list was taken from ceewi1's table and updated based on new information, videocards and powersupplies. The original threads are here:

    http://www.computerforum.com/90110-power-recommendations-video-card.html

    http://www.computerforum.com/90117-ceewi1s-psu-recommendations.html

    ***Wattages and amperages are entire system recommendations****

    ATI/AMD Dual Card

    Card......................................Wattage ..................+12V Amperage


    HD 6990 Crossfire.....................850W ..........................54A
    HD 6970 Crossfire.....................800W ..........................50A
    HD 6950 Crossfire.....................750W .........................48A
    HD 6870 Crossfire.....................700W .........................44A
    HD 6850 Crossfire.....................650W .........................42A
    HD 6790 Crossfire.....................600W .........................40A
    HD 5970 Crossfire....................1200W .........................82A
    HD 5870 Crossfire.....................750W .........................58A
    HD 5850 Crossfire.....................700W .........................52A
    HD 5830 Crossfire.....................700W .........................48A
    HD 5770 Crossfire.....................650W .........................42A
    HD 5750 Crossfire.....................600W .........................38A
    HD 5670 Crossfire.....................550W .........................36A
    HD 4890 Crossfire.....................750W .........................50A
    HD 4870 Crossfire.....................600W .........................42A
    HD 4850 Crossfire.....................550W .........................40A
    HD 3870X2 Crossfire..................750W .........................60A
    HD 3870 Crossfire.....................550W .........................42A
    HD 3850 Crossfire.....................550W .........................42A
    HD 2900XT Crossfire..................750W .........................60A
    HD 2900GT Crossfire..................550W .........................40A
    HD 2600XT Crossfire..................550W .........................30A
    X1950 Crossfire........................550W .........................38A
    X1900GT Crossfire.....................550W .........................38A
    X1800 Crossfire........................550W .........................38A



    ATI/AMD Single Card

    Card..................................Wattage .................+12V Amperage


    HD 6990...............................650W ..........................44A
    HD 6970...............................550W ..........................38A
    HD 6950...............................500W ..........................36A
    HD 6870...............................500W .........................32A
    HD 6850...............................500W .........................30A
    HD 6790...............................500W .........................30A
    HD 5970...............................650W .........................42A
    HD 5870...............................500W .........................34A
    HD 5850...............................500W .........................32A
    HD 5830...............................500W .........................30A
    HD 5770...............................450W .........................26A
    HD 5750...............................450W .........................26A
    HD 5670...............................400W .........................22A
    HD 4890...............................500W .........................36A
    HD 4870x2............................650W .........................42A
    HD 4870...............................500W .........................34A
    HD 4850...............................500W .........................30A
    HD 4830...............................450W .........................28A
    HD 4770...............................500W .........................28A
    HD 4670...............................450W .........................26A
    HD 4650...............................400W .........................24A
    HD 4550...............................350W .........................22A
    HD 3870X2............................550W .........................34A
    HD 3870...............................450W .........................26A
    HD 3850...............................450W .........................26A
    HD 2900XT............................550W .........................34A
    HD 2900GT............................450W .........................30A
    HD 2600XT............................400W .........................22A
    HD 2600Pro...........................400W .........................20A
    HD 2400Pro...........................300W .........................18A
    X1950..................................450W .........................30A
    X1900GT...............................400W .........................25A
    X1900..................................450W .........................30A
    X1900..................................450W .........................30A
    X1800..................................450W .........................30A
    X1650..................................350W .........................20A
    X1300..................................350W .........................18A



    nVidia Dual Card

    Card...................................Wattage .................+12V Amperage


    GTX 590 SLI...........................950W .........................72A
    GTX 580 SLI...........................900W .........................60A
    GTX 570 SLI...........................850W .........................58A
    GTX 560 Ti SLI........................700W .........................50A
    GTX 550 Ti SLI........................600W .........................38A
    GTX 480 SLI...........................850W .........................60A
    GTX 470 SLI...........................800W .........................55A
    GTX 460 SLI...........................700W .........................42A
    GTS 450 SLI...........................600W .........................38A
    GTX 295 SLI..........................1000W ........................70A
    GTX 285 SLI...........................800W .........................50A
    GTX 280 SLI...........................750W .........................48A
    GTX 275 SLI...........................700W .........................46A
    GTX 270 SLI...........................700W .........................46A
    GTX 260 SLI...........................650W .........................42A
    GTS 250 SLI...........................600W .........................38A
    9800GTX+ SLI.........................600W .........................38A
    9800GTX SLI..........................600W ..........................38A
    9800GT SLI............................600W ..........................38A
    9600GT SLI............................500W ..........................28A
    9600GSO SLI..........................450W ..........................26A
    9500GT SLI............................400W ..........................24A
    9400GT SLI............................400W ..........................24A
    8800Ultra SLI.........................750W ..........................60A
    8800GTX SLI..........................700W ..........................56A
    8800GT SLI............................600W...........................48A
    8800GTS SLI..........................650W ..........................52A
    8600GTS SLI..........................450W ..........................24A
    8600GT SLI............................400W ..........................22A
    8500GT SLI............................400W ..........................22A
    7800GTX SLI..........................500W ..........................34A
    7950GT SLI............................500W ..........................28A
    7900GS SLI............................500W ..........................28A
    7800GT SLI............................450W ..........................26A
    7600GT SLI............................400W ..........................24A
    7600GS SLI............................400W ..........................20A


    nVidia Single Card

    Card..................................Wattage .................+12V Amperage


    GTX 590...............................750W .........................46A
    GTX 580...............................600W .........................42A
    GTX 570...............................550W .........................38A
    GTX 560 Ti............................500W .........................30A
    GTX 550 Ti............................450W..........................26A
    GTX 480...............................600W .........................42A
    GTX 470...............................550W .........................38A
    GTX 460...............................450W .........................24A
    GTS 450...............................400W .........................22A
    GT 440.................................300W .........................22A
    GT 430.................................300W .........................22A
    GTX 295...............................680W .........................52A
    GTX 285...............................550W .........................42A
    GTX 280...............................550W .........................40A
    GTX 275...............................550W .........................38A
    GTX 270...............................550W .........................38A
    GTX 260...............................500W .........................36A
    GTS 250...............................450W .........................24A
    GT 240.................................300W .........................18A
    GT 220.................................300W .........................18A
    GT 210.................................300W .........................18A
    9800GX2...............................580W .........................46A
    9800GTX...............................450W .........................38A
    9800GT.................................400W .........................28A
    9600GT.................................400W .........................28A
    9600GSO...............................400W .........................26A
    9500GT.................................350W .........................20A
    9400GT.................................300W .........................18A
    8800Ultra..............................500W .........................34A
    8800GTX...............................450W .........................30A
    8800GT.................................400W .........................26A
    8800GS.................................450W .........................30A
    8800GTS...............................400W .........................28A
    8600GTS...............................350W .........................20A
    8600GT.................................300W .........................20A
    8500GT.................................300W .........................18A
    8400GS.................................300W .........................20A
    7800GTX...............................400W .........................26A
    7950GT.................................350W .........................22A
    7900GS.................................350W .........................20A
    7800GT.................................350W .........................20A
    7800GS.................................350W .........................20A
    7600GT.................................350W .........................18A
    7600GS.................................350W .........................18A
    7300GT.................................350W .........................18A
    7300LE.................................350W ..........................18A
    7300GS.................................300W .........................18A
    7100GS.................................250W .........................18A
    6200LE.................................250W ..........................18A


    Other Low-end/Integrated..........250W.........................18A

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Power Supply Recommendations

    Recommend Power Supplies. In no specific order. Choose based on your power needs.

    XFX P1-650X-CAG9 650W - $59.99 After Rebate: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207002

    Antec NEO ECO 520C - $59.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371030

    Silverstone Strider Plus ST75F-P 750W $129.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817256059

    PC Power and Cooling Silencer Mk II PPCMK2S500 - $89.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817703025

    SeaSonic M12II 620 - $129.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151095 OUT OF STOCK

    XFX Black Edition XPS-850W-BES - $159.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207001

    Xigmatek NRP-MC702 - $109.95: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817815014

    Corsair CMPSU-750TX - $99.99 After Rebate: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139006

    Antec TruePower Quattro TPQ-1000 - $189.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371012

    OCZ ModXStream Pro OCZ700MXSP - $79.99 After Rebate: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341018

    CoolerMaster Silent Pro RS850-AMBAJ3-US - $149.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171048

    Antec EarthWatts EA650 - $64.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371015

    XFX P1-650X-CAH9 650W - $68.99 After Rebate: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817207007

    OCZ Fatal1ty OCZ750FTY - $79.99 After Rebate: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817341041

    Silverstone Strider Plus ST60F-P 600W - $109.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817256064

    Corsair CMPSU-650HX - $104.99 After Rebate: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139012

    CoolerMaster Silent Pro M600 - $69.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817171036

    SeaSonic S12II 520 Bronze 520W - $74.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151094

    Antec TruePower TP-650W - $79.99: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817371021



    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Most graphics card requirement figures came from ceewi1's existing table, new information from http://forum-en.msi.com/index.php?topic=104805.0;wap2 along with various GPU manufacturers websites such as www.xfx.com - www.evga.com - www.sapphiretech.com - www.msi.com - www.gainward.com - www.palit.biz - www.powercolor.com

    Accurately calculating power draw and PSU requirements


    I still see a lot of people recommending power supplies for builds based on the "recommended" wattages put up by Intel/AMD/Nvidia or who ever. For the most part, those will help you, but too many people take that as the minimum wattage for the graphics card or single piece of hardware alone. That is incorrect and leads to people buying stupidly high wattage power supplies when they can run perfectly fine, with overclocking headroom, on half the wattage. To properly calculate required wattage, you need not use over-estimating online calculators, as they are also just a rough guess.

    To calculate your power supply requirements and wattage/amperage you will need, we need a few things:

    • The components you want to buy and their TDP's (Thermal Design Power)
    • Some basic knowledge of electricity and maths
    • A calculator that can add, divide, subtract and multiply
    • A budget for a power supply


    Wattage and Amperage



    Let's begin by taking the following components at their stock specifications and adding their maximum TDP's together for total power draw:

    Intel i7 2600K (95W)
    GTX 570 (225W)
    Samsung F3 1TB (25W)

    Those are maximum values.

    That gives a total of 345 Watts, at maximum load. That means you could run a system with a 2600K and GTX 570 on a quality 400W power supply, and only at bone stock settings. However, a 400W power supply won't have the full 400W available on the one rail. It will be split between the 3.3v, 5v, and 12v rails. For today's computers, the 12v rail is the most important and thus has the most power available compared to the other rails. I have also not included things like Motherboard and RAM power usage because they are hard to find, and not listed on manufacturer sites. Because of this, and overclocking, you want headroom when buying a powersupply. How much depends on how far you intend to overclock or how much hardware you will be packing into your system. Obviously, the more hardware, the more power it will draw.

    But this only gives us a wattage. Sometimes, multiplying the amperage by 12 will give you a smaller number than what is on the wattage sticker. Likewise, diving the wattage by 12 may give you a smaller total amperage than what the sticker tells you. It is very important to calculate both, and use the one that gives you the smaller number. Why? It's because you'd rather be safe than sorry when calculating your power draw. Moving on, 345 divided by 12 gives us 28.75. This would be our maximum amperage draw. Compare this to your chosen PSU's specifications and judge accordingly.


    Efficiency, and why it matters


    Moving on to efficiency. Let's take that previous 345W, and say that the power supply powering those parts is 50% efficient. This still means your system is only drawing 345W from the power supply, but the power supply would be drawing 690 Watts from the wall socket. Why is this important? It's important because this will affect your power bill! This is why you want a power supply that has high efficiency, and because different systems have different roles, you will want a different power supply for a system that will be folding 24/7 and seldom idle, compared to an all-around home system that will be browsing, doing office work and playing games. Let's start with the folding example and the previous parts/wattages listed, and choose a power supply.

    Because the system would be on 24/27 and at maximum load, drawing 345W, we would choose a power supply that would be 80Plus Gold/Platinum rated at 450 watts or so. For example, the Seasonic X-460 Fanless Gold. Why? The power supply will have a small amount of headroom, giving us higher efficiency. This will help lessen your power bill compared to running an 850W 80Plus Silver rated power supply. Why? The power supply would be under a lower load, leaving us with lower efficiency, which will mean it draws more power from the socket and will increase your power bill.

    Let's take that same system and wattage and assume it's a home system this time. It's almost the same deal, except that the system would be idling most of the time, but would still reach maximum load on games and perhaps benchmarks. Efficiency will once again play a part in this. In this position, something like a Seasonic X-650 80Plus Gold will be more ideal for the home user/gamer/benchmarker. For one, you will still have decent efficiency at idle/low loads, you will have good efficiency at full load, and you will also have headroom for overclocking or another graphics card.


    Conclusion



    In conclusion, before choosing a power supply and parts, it is utterly important to properly calculate your needed wattage and amperage. The best case scenario of a bad/wrong power supply is having an AX1200 for a system that draws 200W. Your system will work perfectly fine, but efficiency will be woeful. In the reverse scenario, having a system that needs 600w on a 450W power supply, you are likely to end up with dead hardware. While I have not touched on quality vs. junk power supplies, it is very important to choose a quality one for your peace of mind and for your wallet. You don't want to be replacing your entire system because your yum cha power supply blew up into smoke. Please take the time to research your power needs carefully!
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2011
  2. StrangleHold

    StrangleHold Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    19,543
    My only problem with power supplies guides.

    Just having a bad or good. The bad list is no brainer. But just having a good list is alittle misleading. Say above the Rosewill, even the better units should not be on the same list as like the Corsair HX/any Seasonic/XFX units. Cooler Master can have models that land in a good or better class depending on the model. Same with OCZ different models.

    I know it would be more complicated.

    But a Good/Better and Best list would be cool. Like by Manufacture and Model.

    Now the Power Supply Recommendations. Thats going to be hard to keep up with. New models/sale prices/free shipping. One model of XFX this week thats a good deal gets beat next week by Corsair with 20 bucks off and free shipping. Not saying its a bad idea, but hard to keep up with.

    And watch how you word things. Like the Zalman in the Power Supply Recommendations. You said it was made by Zalman. Its sold by Zalman, but made by Enhance.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2010
  3. Intel_man

    Intel_man VIP Member

    Messages:
    5,699
    So change the ranking to

    Avoid

    Decent

    Good


    Like that?
     
  4. Benny Boy

    Benny Boy Active Member

    Messages:
    2,861
    ^I think he means.
    Avoid list not needed. Just "If it's not on the list, it's - not recommended (or is to be avoided)" and not list those no braniers.
    The list could have only the recommended, like
    Good
    Better
    Best
    With the label name & model, without who manufactured it or who's components it has, or prices.

    Then when someone's shopping, they can refer to the list for their shopped/comboed etc choice.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2010
  5. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Right then, If you guys think I should remove the "avoid" list then I will. Recommended powersupplies will be hard to keep up with, but I have plenty of time on my hands. I'll make it easier to read as well. If you have any specific recommendations or ones to remove from the list, feel free to post :)
     
  6. Aastii

    Aastii VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,291
    CM, Xclio, Gigabyte and Thermaltake shouldn't be on the good list, I would also rethink EVGA, their units are the same as Antec's and Corsair's for the most part, but, generally, cost a whole lot more. If I had to build a system, or was advising someone to build a system, I would lead them to Antec or Corsair first rather than EVGA, you get equal or better performance, for less price.

    Zalman is listed twice on the good list

    Be Quiet! Isn't listed at all on any of the lists, they should be on the good
     
  7. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Right. I got in contact with mep, for now this guide is a draft, we'll be making changes in a few days so consider it under contruction
     
  8. StrangleHold

    StrangleHold Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    19,543
    Something like a Good/Better and Best with Manufacture and Model.
     
  9. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    I agree, and I'll talk to mep about it :)
     
  10. StrangleHold

    StrangleHold Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    19,543
    Like Corsair could fit in each class. From the Builders Series to TX/HX and AX series. But there will be arguments about what models fit where with each manufacture. LOL
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2010
  11. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    It's quite complicated isn't it? :( That's why I chose wattage...
     
  12. StrangleHold

    StrangleHold Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    19,543
    No, I just mean in the Good/Better and Best list.
     
  13. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Right.

    Any comments on the updated power recommendation by video card? Am I missing any cards or would they fall under 'other lowend/integrated' ?
     
  14. StrangleHold

    StrangleHold Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    19,543
    I would cut the list alittle. With Nvidia stop at the 8500GT. AMD with the 3850. Not to many people buying X1900 or a 7900GT anymore. Would make the list shorter to add newer cards as they come out.
     
  15. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Very true. to be honest I just added the new cards, and mep is working on formatting it properly so all the voltages and amperages line up correctly.
     
  16. NVX_185

    NVX_185 Member

    Messages:
    327
    Alright, I think I'll actually say something nice and cut this kid some slack, ;)

    This is a great guide mate. It was good you stressed how important the PSU is in a computer, along with the fact that it could take out components with it if it failed. You should look for PSU's that 'fail safe', if you like.

    Also I think you could add to your article a little further, and stress that just wattage alone doesn't determine the correct application of the PSU for a setup... E.g., just because a good quality (e.g., Antec) PSU brand has 1k Watts, doesn't mean it will support a quad-SLi system... You need to take into account 12v rails, amperage on each rail, etc. ;)

    Other than that, this should be a great guide for helping those a little less illiterate on PSU's.

    After saying all this & reading this guide, I regret the purchase of a Tt Litepower 700W about a month ago :p
     
  17. linkin

    linkin VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,521
    Thanks :)

    Ahh the litepowers! I had the 600w version. which this OCZ replaced. my brother has the litepower now, he's only running an E4400 and a 5770 so it should be okay :p

    I will make sure to note that wattage != quality/meets requirements too.
     
  18. bomberboysk

    bomberboysk Active Member

    Messages:
    13,257
    I wouldn't ever recommend making a list solely on brand, plenty of examples out there of manufacturers who have both good and bad units on the market. OCZ for example is mostly cheap sirtec/FSP built stuff, not exactly what I would consider to be "good" units, more along the lines of "reasonably sufficient", as you definitely don't want to be pushing OCZ units at or near their rated wattages. I also see a few flaws in the bad list, most notably being sparkle. Sparkle has some decent units on the market (specifically those manufactured by great wall), Kingwin has decent units (Mach 1, Lazer for instance), Azza as well has had some decent Superflower manufactured ones.

    As far as the Xclio units, i would consider all of the units ("Highend" or "lowend") to be middle of the road products, most of their units are manufactured by CWT, and have relatively decent specs, but nothing spectacular. Same for the rosewill units, "Highend" just doesn't give much information, there are only a handful (<10) of rosewill units that i would even consider recommending.

    Basically, broad generalizations about power supplies based solely on manufacturer/reseller is unreliable. (XFX, Seasonic, Zalman, PCP&C(actually, with the release of the silencer Mk. II's i would hesitate to consider all pcp&c units great, as the original silencer outperforms the Mk. II in regulation and ripple suppression), and Enermax are all that coe to mind for units that are always good quality).


    EVGA sells one power supply, the SR-2 PSU. Its a TPQ-1200 OC edition from antec (built from Enhance internals) with a few small tweaks as well as a compliment of connectors to support the SR-2 and a quad sli setup. Corsair generally uses tweaked Seasonic or CWT platforms for their power supplies, a notable exception being the AX-1200 which was designed by corsair specifically and OEM'ed by flextronics.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2010
  19. Aastii

    Aastii VIP Member

    Messages:
    13,291
    Every time I ever tried to do any research into them, I could only find info on one unit and thought I must be overlooking something, but obviously not. So far as I know, that unit is just an an Antec Quattro with a couple extra PCIe cables, very expensive PCIe cables at that...
     
  20. bomberboysk

    bomberboysk Active Member

    Messages:
    13,257
    Yeah, You're paying roughly $50-70 more than the TPQ-1200 OC for some extra PCIe cables(12x 6+2pin and 3x 6pin, vs 6x6 and 6x6+2 on the tpq-1200 OC), 2 less sata power connectors, 3 less molex,and 1 less floppy. It's mean't mainly for owners of SR-2 motherboards as it specifically fulfills the power connection requirements of that board. Granted, you do get EVGA support/warranty, which is pretty much the best in the business. Personally, I would just get the $219 tpq-1200 (non-OC edition) from provantage.
     

Share This Page